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Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 22 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

James Naismith and Forrest Claire (Phog) Allen

D'Ambra, Duke

Photograph of Dr. James Naismith and Forrest Claire (Phog) Allen holding a basketball at the University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas.

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Menninger Family Therapy Training Program for Community Practitioners in Topeka, Kansas

This photograph is of the first graduating class of the two year Family therapy Training Program for Community Practitioners at the Menninger Foundation, Topeka, Kansas. It shows the faculty and graduates.

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John Wesley Horner

Stephenson

This cabinet card shows John Wesley Horner, (1834-1874). A veteran of the Civil War, he served as colonel of the 18th Michigan Infantry before becoming the fifth President of Baker University in Baldwin, Kansas, (1866-1867). Within a year of his presidency, he left Baker to pursue a career as a newspaper publisher. On January 6, 1869, Horner and A. S. Cory founded the Chetopa Advance, the second newspaper, in Labette County, Kansas. He held the positions of editor and publisher until he sold the business, in 1873, to L. J. Van Landingham. On August 16, 1874, Horner passed away at the age of forty during a stay at the Kansas Insane Asylum. He was later buried on the grounds of the asylum. The photograph was taken in Ypsilanti, Michigan.

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Ernest Hiram Lindley

This black and white photograph shows Ernest Hiram Lindley, (1869-1940), the seventh chancellor of the University of Kansas, (1920-1939). During his first few years as chief executive officer he successfully secured $3.5 million dollars from the Kansas Legislature for building appropriations. With these funds a number of buildings were constructed across campus including: Hoch Auditorium, Strong Hall, Watson Library and the women's first dormitory, Corbin Hall. He was also instrumental in expanding the school's instructional offerings by establishing a school of business, and a school of chemical engineering and preventive medicine. For nineteen years Lindley served as the chancellor of the University of Kansas, longer than anyone before him. However, after enduring a number of difficult years with the State Board of Administration over employment practices, he resigned on June 30, 1939. A year later, the seventy-year old educator became ill while traveling abroad. He later died, on August 21, 1940, aboard the passenger liner Asama Maru with burial conducted at sea.

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James Naismith

James Naismith invented the game of basketball. In 1891, while working as a physical education teacher at the YMCA International Training School in Springfield, Massachusetts, Naismith was asked to develop a game that would not take up much room, was not too rough, and at the same time, could be played indoors. Inspired by a game he played as a child in Canada called "Duck on a Rock," his game was first played on December 15, 1891, with thirteen rules (modified versions of twelve of those are still used today), a peach basket nailed to either end of the school's gymnasium, and two teams of nine players. On January 15, 1892, Naismith published the rules for basketball. The original rules did not include what is known today as the dribble, and only allowed the ball to be moved up or down the court via passes between players. Naismith moved to Lawrence, Kansas, in 1898, following his studies in Denver, to serve as a professor, and the school's first basketball coach, at the University of Kansas. The University of Kansas went on to develop one of the nation's most storied college basketball programs.

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Mary Bailey Sweet

This black and white photograph shows Mary Bailey Sweet benefactress of Washburn University in Topeka Kansas. The daughter of Timothy Bailey Sweet and Annie Brown Sweet she graduated from the College of Sisters of Bethany in Topeka and was valedictorian of the class of 1898. Mary attended Washburn College from 1900-1901, as a music student before graduating from the University of Kansas in 1903. After graduation, she taught at the Methodist Deaconess Training School in Chicago from 1903 to 1910 and later at the Methodist School for Girls in Rome, Italy from 1912 to 1914. During her stay in Italy Mary also worked with the Red Cross assisting with World War I efforts. At the close of the war, Mary returned to the United States to teach at the Methodist Deaconess school in Seattle, Washington where she taught for several years before returning to Topeka, Kansas. Mary became an active member of the community and to Washburn College. In 1952, Mary and her sisters Susie and Annie established the Sweet Foundation in memory of their brother Paul. The endowment provides scholarships to young men and women who attend Washburn. In 1955 Mary established the Sweet Summer Sabbatical Fund. With this endowment faculty at the university are given the opportunity to broaden their teaching experiences during the summer months through travel and research. Mary's commitment to education also extended into the community. She taught adult Sunday School classes at the First Methodist Church and was a member of numerous organizations including the Kansas Authors Club, and the Topeka Art Guild. Mary died on April 3, 1964 at the age of eighty-five.

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Mamie Luella Williams

Portrait of Mamie Luella Williams, 1894-1986, an elementary school teacher and principal in Topeka, Kansas. In 1965 she was appointed to the Kansas Commission on the Status of Women, served as a delegate to the 1971 White House Conference on Aging, and was active on the Senior Citizens Advisory Council for the Republican Party for Kansas, 1974-1976. She received the Washburn University Distinguished Service Award in 1973, and an honorary doctorate in mathematics from Washburn in 1982. Williams Science and Fine Arts Elementary Magnet School at 1301 S.E. Monroe, Topeka, Kansas, was named in honor of Ms. Williams.

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Peter McVicar

Snyder, Photographer

Peter McVicar came to Kansas in 1860 from Maine. He was the first pastor of the Topeka Congregational Church. He later served as president of Washburn College

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Bluemont Central College (later Kansas State University) founders and early professors, Manhattan, Kansas

This is a photograph of Robert L. Harford, J. G. Schnebly, Washington Marlatt, Joseph Denison, and Isaac T. Goodnow, the first five professors at Bluemont Central College, which later became Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas.

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Ernest Hiram Lindley

This black and white photograph shows Ernest Hiram Lindley, (1869-1940), the seventh chancellor of the University of Kansas, (1920-1939). During his first few years as chief executive officer he successfully secured $3.5 million dollars from the Kansas Legislature for building appropriations. With these funds a number of buildings were constructed across campus including: Hoch Auditorium, Strong Hall, Watson Library and the women's first dormitory, Corbin Hall. He was also instrumental in expanding the school's instructional offerings by establishing a school of business, and a school of chemical engineering and preventive medicine. For nineteen years, Lindley served as the chancellor of the University of Kansas, longer than anyone before him. However, after enduring a number of difficult years with the State Board of Administration over employment practices, he resigned on June 30, 1939. A year later the seventy-year old educator became ill while traveling abroad. He later died, on August 21, 1940, aboard the passenger liner Asama Maru with burial conducted at sea.

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