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Type of Material -- Unpublished documents (Remove)
Date -- 1900s (Remove)
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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 12 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Clifford W. Beers papers

Beers, Clifford Whittingham, 1876-1943

Beers' papers, largely, consist of handwritten and typed incoming and outgoing letters, as well as some correspondence about Beers. Correspondents include some family members, such as his wife Clara's parents and Clifford's brother George, but mostly include friends and acquaintances, such as Erua Geuil Perriu, Marie O.Ley, Paul "Mac" McQuaid, Elizabeth Warner, Louise Gaffney, Dr. and Mrs. Toulouse, Mary Louise Bok, William and Alice James, and others. The subjects of the letters mostly concern Beers' efforts toward bettering the lives of patients with mental illnesses and the publication of his book, A Mind that Found Itself. The materials also include Beers' courtship letters to Miss Jepson (parts of which were removed by Clara before she donated them to the Menninger Foundation, as she deemed them too personal) and letters he wrote to her after they were married. Some letters are in French.

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Historic Psychiatry original miscellaneous documents

These are a variety of handwritten and typed letters, lectures, autographs, news clippings, biographical information, images and sketches, court documents, and other documents related to the history of psychiatry. These documents are housed in four boxes and the folders within are arranged alphabetically by surname or title, and they are included in the larger collection of historic psychiatry material in the Menninger Archives. Authors come from such fields as medicine, religion, prison and other reform and advocacy movements, politics, the military, etc. The documents themselves sometimes provide significant information, and sometimes they were collected because their authors were significant historical figures. Some of the individuals found in Box 1 include James Mark Baldwin, Ludwig Binswanger, Eugen Bleuler, Jean-Martin Charcot, Elizabeth Fry, Oliver Wendell Holmes, and Carl Jung. Some of the individuals found in Box 2 include Alfred Adler, Robert Frost, and Washinton Irving. This box also includes a 68-page handwritten notebook by Dr. W.W. Reed entitled "Reminiscenses About the Treatment of the Insane." Some of the individuals found in Box 3 include Amariah Brigham and Frederick van Eeden. This box also includes a correspondence file (1883-1888) on Ellen Kehoe, a patient at the Worcester Lunatic Hospital in Massachusetts, and a series of drawings from the 1920s and 1930s by a Belgian patient suffering from paranoia named Andreas at the Kankakee State Hospital in Illinois. The drawings were donated by Dr. J.B. Gier, formerly of the Topeka Veteran's Administration Hospital, who knew the patient and encouraged his work. Box 4 includes a miscellaneous folder regarding insane asylums and contains legal documents, postcard images, and receipts for services. Languages include English, German, French and Italian, and transcriptions or translations follow some of the documents.

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Sigmund Freud correspondence

Freud, Sigmund, 1856-1939

These are handwritten and typed letters by Sigmund Freud, the Austrian psychoanalyst. Main correspondents include Emil Oberholzer, Dr. T. Schnierer, and Karl Menninger, among others. These letters are written in German and English and some translations are included. Correspondence relating to Freud's departure from Vienna in 1938 is also included. Material not made available online includes articles and publications under copyright about Freud and his work. These letters are part of the historic psychiatry material in the Menninger Archives. Many of the items in this portion of the Menninger Archives were purchased.

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Temperance history correspondence

Correspondence relating to the Kansas State Temperance Union and its activities promoting the enforcement of prohibition in the state of Kansas. Frank M. Stahl served as superintendent and John Marshall served as attorney. They wrote a number of the letters contained in this collection. Leaders of the temperance movement frequently corresponded with county attorneys, civic leaders, ministers, and pastors. Included are several letters supporting James A. Lyons of Langdon, Kansas, who was charged with selling intoxicating liquors, and a circular announcing the guilty verdict in the case of Assistant Attorney General C. W. Trickett of Wyandotte County, Kansas, who accepted illegal fees in the prosecution of liquor cases. The collection contains correspondence from numerous Kansas communities.

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Charles M. Sheldon and Central Congregational Church correspondence

Charles M. Sheldon (1857-1946) served as minister of the Central Congregational Church in Topeka, Kansas from 1889 to 1920. He was also an author of the international best seller, In His Steps, which was published in 1897. A series of correspondence, presented here, is arranged in chronological order. A complete description of the entire collection is available through a link below. The correspondence consists of letters, postcards, cards, one notebook containing letters and newspaper clippings, and assorted personal items such as his self-portrait drawings. The majority of the correspondence consists of handwritten and typed letters to and from individuals, members or groups related to the Central Congregational Church, and organizations associated with his lifelong activities as a pastor and author, including Theo Peers, Ethel Peers, Anna Heartburg, Dorothy Heartburg, Helen T. Capps, Lida R. Hardy, May Flickinger, Charles Warren Helsley, Luther D. Whittemore, Hamilton Holt, Robert Thomson Jr., Norman J. Rimes, Lloyd George, James Wise, Arthur Capper, Michael I. Pupin, Alf M. Landon, Roy B. Guild, Arthur E. Hertzler, Samuel J. Crumbine, Wilbert E. Dull, M. de Arrude Camargo, Frank J. Warren, Beatrice Hoover, Samuel C. Spalding, H. T. Chase, Bishop Wise, The Emporia Gazette, Green Gables (the Dr. Benjamin F. Bailey Sanatorium), The Atlantic Monthly, The World?s Christian Endeavor Union, Plymouth Congregational Church, University of Illinois at Urbana Department of Physics, Abraham S. Hoyo, Harry Emerson Fosdick, International College in Turkey, Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America, Rollins College in Florida, The Topeka City Commission, Students? Christian Association of South Africa, Crosset & Dunlap Inc. Publishers in New York, Christian Herald Association, The Texas Herald, The Henry F. Henrichs Publications, Frankfort Rotary Club, and Notre-Dame de France/Jerusalem. There are letters involving other individuals, including Charles W. Helsley, Emma Crabb, H. J. Colburn, Robert Stone, Arthur G. Sellen, Henry F. Henrichs, Logan Shoop, Frank Jacobs, Hugh F. Mckean, Lee Braxton, Cady Hodge, Charles S. Lawrence, Elizabeth Turner Rawlings, Elisabeth Ebright, R. L. McNatt, Gale L. Beck, John H. Lehman, Helen Bradford, and Everett R. Daves. Charles W. Helsley was a minister at the Central Congregational Church after the passing of Charles M. Sheldon, and Emma Crabb was in charge of the Sheldon Collection at the Central Congregational Church.

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Eugene Ware correspondence

This is a series of correspondence to and from Eugene Fitch Ware (1841-1911). Ware moved to Fort Scott, Kansas, after the Civil War and became employed at the Fort Scott Monitor. In 1879, Ware began the first of three terms in the Kansas State Senate. During his terms of office, Ware introduced bills concerning railroads, life insurance, militia, and relief and support of the poor as well as bills of a more local nature. Ware moved to Topeka in 1893 to become a partner with Charles Gleed and his brother, James, forming the law firm of Gleed, Ware and Gleed. In addition to journalism, law, and politics, Ware used the pseudonym, Ironquill, for his literary and poetic achievements. His works include "Neutralia" and "The Rhymes of Ironquill". For a complete contents list of the papers of Eugene Fitch Ware, see the External Links below.

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Isabella Barnes to Governor Edward Hoch

Barnes, Isabella

Mrs. Isabella Barnes of Liberal, Kansas, writes Governor Edward Hoch of Topeka concerning her wish to wear men's clothing. Mrs. Barnes states that she would like to wear men's clothing to help her obtain suitable employment and avoid unwanted insults from men. She has contacted the U. S. Attorney General at Washington D. C. concerning this issue and asks Governor Hoch if she would be liable to arrest and if there was not some way for a woman to receive permission to wear men's clothes. Isabella's concerns illustrate many women's efforts to transcend narrowly defined social and sexual roles in the early twentieth century.

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James Naismith's medical license application

Board of Healing Arts

James Naismith's application for a medical license from the Kansas State Board of Medical Registration and Examination. Naismith is credited with inventing the game of basketball. In 1890 he entered the YMCA college in Springfield, Massachusetts, and it was there that James Naismith came up with the new game. From Springfield, Naismith went to Denver where he acquired a medical degree and in 1898 he joined the University of Kansas' faculty at Lawrence. He remained in Lawrence until his death in 1939. Along with the application, is a notice of Naismith's death.

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William James (psychologist) correspondence

James, William, 1842-1910

Primarily consists of originals and copies of handwritten letters, postcards, and one manuscript written by James. Correspondents include cousin Anne Edwards, Professor W. Lutoslawski, Susan Goldmark, Thomas Sergeant Perry, Guy Waring, and others. Topics include James' writing, his health, the 1906 San Francisco earthquake (James and his family were at Stanford University when it happened), lecturing and travel, care of the insane, the change in Harvard University's presidency in 1910, and other topics. Also included is a letter from Alice James, William's wife, to Guy Waring after William's death; Karl Menninger's reading notes from James' San Francisco earthquake manuscript; and a 1970 article on James' life.

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Temperance history correspondence

Correspondence sent and received by members of the Kansas State Temperance Union, primarily Rev. W. L. Dexter, secretary, Robert Norris, secretary, Julian K. Codding, lawyer, and William T. Jones, solicitor. Correspondents include Elizabeth P. Hutchinson, president of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union, Rev. Purley A. Baker, superintendent of the American Anti-Saloon League, Mary Evelyn Dobbs, Rev. Charles W. Whorrall, and William H. McCamish, assistant attorney general of Wyandotte County. Included in this correspondence are several signed petitions to members of the U.S. Senate from citizens in Arkansas City, Kirwin, and Abilene asking them to vote against the Hamilton Bill which they argue "would annul the solemn pledge of the Government to protect the Indians against the introduction and sale of intoxicants in the Indian territory." Some financial records are also included, such as a report from the finance committee for the previous year, ending February 15, 1905, and receipts and disbursements by month, signed by financial manager S. H. Pitcher. Although Kansas was the first state to adopt a constitutional amendment prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors in 1880, the law was largely unenforced.

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