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Page 1 of 1, showing 5 records out of 5 total, starting on record 1, ending on 5

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Historic Psychiatry original miscellaneous documents

These are a variety of handwritten and typed letters, lectures, autographs, news clippings, biographical information, images and sketches, court documents, and other documents related to the history of psychiatry. These documents are housed in four boxes and the folders within are arranged alphabetically by surname or title, and they are included in the larger collection of historic psychiatry material in the Menninger Archives. Authors come from such fields as medicine, religion, prison and other reform and advocacy movements, politics, the military, etc. The documents themselves sometimes provide significant information, and sometimes they were collected because their authors were significant historical figures. Some of the individuals found in Box 1 include James Mark Baldwin, Ludwig Binswanger, Eugen Bleuler, Jean-Martin Charcot, Elizabeth Fry, Oliver Wendell Holmes, and Carl Jung. Some of the individuals found in Box 2 include Alfred Adler, Robert Frost, and Washinton Irving. This box also includes a 68-page handwritten notebook by Dr. W.W. Reed entitled "Reminiscenses About the Treatment of the Insane." Some of the individuals found in Box 3 include Amariah Brigham and Frederick van Eeden. This box also includes a correspondence file (1883-1888) on Ellen Kehoe, a patient at the Worcester Lunatic Hospital in Massachusetts, and a series of drawings from the 1920s and 1930s by a Belgian patient suffering from paranoia named Andreas at the Kankakee State Hospital in Illinois. The drawings were donated by Dr. J.B. Gier, formerly of the Topeka Veteran's Administration Hospital, who knew the patient and encouraged his work. Box 4 includes a miscellaneous folder regarding insane asylums and contains legal documents, postcard images, and receipts for services. Languages include English, German, French and Italian, and transcriptions or translations follow some of the documents.

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Sigmund Freud correspondence

Freud, Sigmund, 1856-1939

These are handwritten and typed letters by Sigmund Freud, the Austrian psychoanalyst. Main correspondents include Emil Oberholzer, Dr. T. Schnierer, and Karl Menninger, among others. These letters are written in German and English and some translations are included. Correspondence relating to Freud's departure from Vienna in 1938 is also included. Material not made available online includes articles and publications under copyright about Freud and his work. These letters are part of the historic psychiatry material in the Menninger Archives. Many of the items in this portion of the Menninger Archives were purchased.

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Andrieus A. Jones to Edmund G. Ross

Ross, Edmund G. (Edmund Gibson), 1826-1907

Jones acknowledges receipt of copies of Ross's history of the presidential impeachment trial and will share it with leading Democrats in Chicago during the campaign convention.

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Charles M. Sheldon memorials

Charles M. Sheldon (1857-1946) served as a minister of the Central Congregational Church in Topeka, Kansas from 1889 to 1920. He was also an author of the international best seller, In His Steps, which was published in 1897. A series of memorials, presented here, comprises part of the Charles Monroe Sheldon/Central Congregational Church Collection. A complete description of the entire collection is available through a link below. This series includes letters, a notebook, published articles, and assorted items surrounding Sheldon's death and memorials in his honor. The letters are to and from individuals and members or groups associated with Sheldon's study, the Altruist Club of Central Congregational Church organized by Sheldon, and exhibits related to Sheldon after his death. Correspondents include Carl K. Linge, Elsei Hobson, Hugh F. McKean, Charles W. Helsley, Howard S. Searle, Hermione Adams, Brewster Place, Catharine Brandenburg, Andrew K. Craig, John Goodin, Emma Crabb, Walter Earl Glover Architect, Bailey-Reynolds Chandelier Company, D. O. Coe Seed & Grain Company, Pilgrim Congregational Church in California, and First (Park) Congregational Church. Emma Crabb was in charge of the Sheldon Collection at the Central Congregational Church. The publication, Congregational KANSAS, published in 1946, provides his picture on the cover page and an article titled "Dr. Charles Monroe Sheldon, Congregational Minister." The topics of other publications, such as the Congressional Record of 1946, and PROGRESS, also published in 1946, include Sheldon's lifelong activities as a pastor and author.

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Walker Winslow correspondence

Winslow, Walker, 1905-1969

This handwritten and typed correspondence is between Walker Winslow (also under the name Harold Maine) and his third wife, Edna Manley Winslow. The letters can be chatty and newsy, providing details about each of their daily lives and activities, what they were reading or music to which they were listening, their work (his writing and therapy, her writing and painting), and other related topics. The letters can be very self-reflective and analytical regarding their relationship to each other, relationships with others, their health and various injuries and illnesses they each had, money, their mutual loneliness, Edna's drinking, and other topics. There is also correspondence with friends and relatives of Winslow and/or Edna, Winslow family photographs, some sketches Edna drew, and extensive correspondence between Winslow and Dr. Karl Menninger. Walker Winslow was the author of "The Menninger Story" and "If A Man Be Mad." Some of the letters were written while Winslow was working at and writing in Topeka, Kansas. They were also written while the Winslows lived separately in Santa Fe, New Mexico; various parts of California (especially Big Sur or Oakland); various parts of New York (especially Rochester and New York City); and in Kansas. The letters document the rise and fall of their brief and intense relationship. Given the nature of some of the content, several pieces of correspondence have not been made available on Kansas Memory, but they are still available to researchers.

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