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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

State Industrial School for Boys, Topeka, Kansas

This silent film documents the State Industrial School for Boys of Topeka, Kansas, in 1935 and depicts all aspects of the institution's educational, health, recreational, vocational and boarding programs. A segment of the film shows Governor Alfred M. Landon visiting the school and making a speech. The school opened in 1881 and sought to reform boys under the age of sixteen who had committed criminal acts. The school taught boys to be farmers, dairymen, tailors, carpenters, linemen, cobblers, barbers, cooks, waiters, machinists, and engineers.

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Spirit of Washington, Washington School, Topeka, Kansas

Thompson, Joseph A.

This silent film documents a day at Washington School, a Black elementary school located at 1025 Washington, Topeka, Kansas. The film follows each grade level through various activities throughout the day. Washington was one of four Black elementary schools in Topeka prior to the the U. S. Supreme Court ruling in Brown v. The Board of Education (1954) that called for the desegregation of public schools.

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Kansas Emergency Relief Committee accomplishments movie

Kansas. Emergency Relief Commission

This motion picture film documents the various work projects completed in Kansas during President Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal. It begins with an introduction to the Kansas Emergency Relief Committee personnel, starting with the executive director, John G. Stutz. It then shows the various projects across the state, including the construction of farm ponds and lakes as part of the Water Conservation Program, the renovation and construction of courthouses, schools, libraries, and other public buildings, and the weaving and sewing rooms that produced clothing for needy Kansans. It also includes footage of rabbit drives, dust storms, and women sweeping piles of dust out of their homes. Click on the thumbnails below to play each clip. Click on Text Version for a detailed description of each chapter.

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