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Thematic Time Period -- Immigration and Settlement, 1854 - 1890 (Remove)
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Page 1 of 4, showing 10 records out of 32 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

The state of Kansas and Irish immigration

Butler, Thomas Ambrose

In this pamphlet, Irish Catholic priest Thomas Ambrose Butler describes his experience in Kansas as a pastor at the Catholic cathedral in Leavenworth. Butler provides advice to people in Ireland who are thinking of immigrating to the United States.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania of his journey to Kansas City to obtain a land warrant for Topeka and to attend the Free State Convention. Two of his articles had been published in The Herald of Freedom, a Lawrence newspaper, and he sent copies. Mentioning political difficulties, Holliday suggested that his wife wait until fall to travel to Kansas. He rented out his cabin in Topeka for profit. A deadly cholera epidemic at Fort Riley had ended.

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C. E. Blood to Hiram Hill

Blood, C.E.

C.E. Blood wrote from Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts. Blood told Hill that, by mistake, a house had been built on one of Hill's town lots. He offered to trade lots with Hill, maintaining that both were of equal quality and value, and told him that the house would serve as the printing office of a new newspaper, the Manhattan Statesman.

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Edmund Jones to Hiram Hill

Jones, Edmund

Edmund Jones oversaw the building of a house in Lawrence, Kansas Territory for Hiram Hill, a resident of Williamsburgh, Massachusetts. He wrote to update Hill on construction progress. Jones was frustrated with the plasterer, Mr. Johnson, who was sick and whose work was poor and rate too high. S. N. Simpson had returned to town. Jones mentioned the health of Mrs. Whitney and Mrs. Herd. Page 2 is primarily a list of expenses for materials and labor and a list of amounts received, including rent income.

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Kansas State Capitol building, Topeka, Kansas, 1867

Gardner, Alexander, 1821-1882

This stereograph shows the Kansas State Capitol building under construction in Topeka, Shawnee County, Kansas, in 1867. The photograph shows scaffolding, workers, building stone, and a portion of the completed first floor. The stereograph is from Alexander Gardner's series, "Across the Continent on the Union Pacific Railway, Eastern Division," and includes the notation "351 miles west of St. Louis Mo."

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Henry L. Denison to Joseph Denison

Denison, Henry

Henry Denison wrote from Bluemont College in Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to his uncle Joseph Denison, a Trustee of the College. Henry informed him that dry summer conditions had significantly impeded crop growth. The drought also affected the construction of the College, as the plasterers depended on the water supply of a nearby creek to mix their plaster; carpenters, however, moved forward with their work. Henry closed with a mention of a recent eclipse.

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Edmund Jones to Hiram Hill

Jones, Edmund

Well before Hiram Hill of Williamsburgh, Massachusetts could have received Edmund Jones' previous letter from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, Jones received a bank draft from Hill. In this letter, Jones thanked him for the draft. He shortly expected two renters, Mrs. Herd and Mrs. Hall, to move into Hill's house in Lawrence. These renters wanted to build a house for their own boarders on the lot behind. A store and an office were going up on either side of Hill's new house. James mentioned controversy over city lots but did not identify the source of this "new movement." He encouraged Hill to visit Lawrence a second time in early fall.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday, the founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. He told her of his planned trip up the Kansas River, his pleasure in the people of Kansas Territory, and a Thanksgiving dinner he attended. Unwilling to return to Pennsylvania, Holliday expressed desire that Mary come to Kansas Territory and described the construction of a friend's sod-covered "mansion," one such as Clarina I. H. Nichols, a lecturer and writer, inhabited.

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Hiram Hill to Edmund Jones

Jones, Edmund

Hiram Hill wrote to Edmund Jones in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, where Jones was completing construction on Hill's new house. Hill was surprised by the amount of Jones' expenses, and he insisted that Jones negotiate payment of Mr. Johnson, the plasterer. Hill planned to visit Lawrence, but was delayed by his oldest brother's illness. Hill relayed the health of Hill family members and others. He had advised Mrs. Hill to go to Kansas to improve her health. The letter ends abruptly, without a signature, and it possibly lacks pages.

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Lange's Drug Store, Leavenworth, Kansas

This photograph shows an exterior view of Lange's Drug Store on the corner of 4th and Shawnee streets in Leavenworth, Kansas. A sign advertising "Drugs and Medicines" and showing the traditional mortar and pestle pharmacy symbol is visible. The large sign on the right side of the building reads, "Lange's Drug Store. Drugs and medicines, paints, oils, brushes, and glass. Choice wines and liquors. Fine perfumery, toilet articles, soaps, sponges. Trusses a specialty. Prescriptions compounded day and night. Old Wizard oil, best family medicine." The sign farther to the right advertises "Tutt's Liver Pills." The sign above the arched window on the corner reads "Apotheke," the German word for a pharmacy . The sign to the left reads "Adolf Lange." Other businesses visible to the left of the picture include a store for boots and shoes, and a store with a sign reading, "Commission. Gus. O. L. Sauer." Two horse-drawn wagons are visible on the left, and trolley tracks are visible running along the dirt street. This same building was previously the Central Drug Store owned by Theodore Egersdorff.

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