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Thematic Time Period -- Immigration and Settlement, 1854 - 1890 (Remove)
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Page 1 of 19, showing 10 records out of 184 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Resolution of the Kansas and Nebraska Annual Conference

This copy of a resolution, drafted by the Kansas and Nebraska Annual Conference of Omaha City, Nebraska Territory, resolved to approve the efforts of the Trustees of Bluemont Cental College in Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to "erect a noble college edifice" and to support Isaac Goodnow's continuation as Agent.

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A. H. Reeder to Franklin Crane

Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864

Andrew Reeder, former governor of Kansas Territory, wrote from Easton, Pennsylvania to Dr. Franklin Crane of Topeka. The letter discussed business interests in Kansas Territory and prospects for its admission to the union. Reeder also suggested it might be beneficial to replace place names, which had been established by the bogus legislature, that had pro-slavery connections.

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Jonathan Crews to Thomas Nesbit Stinson

Crews, Jonathan

Jonathan Crews, writing from LaPorte, Indiana, expressed strong proslavery views on the situation in Kansas. Crews described his trip home to Indiana from Kansas and discussed several Indiana court cases involving his business interests.

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Charles Chadwick to Hiram Hill

Chadwick, Charles

Charles Chadwick wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, concerning several 40 acre lots which were marked off shortly before Samuel N. Simpson left town. It appeared to Chadwick that those Simpson had purchased were purchased on the behalf of absentee investors, such as Hill, even though they had not been divided or designated in the name of any others. Chadwick presumed that Abelard Guthrie would allow Hill to have the land he thought was being purchased in his name upon payment to the Town Company. Chadwick also reported that prices of land were staying up in Quindaro, and that business development continued.

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Joseph Harrington Trego to an unidentified recipient [probably his wife, Alice Trego]

Trego, Joseph H. (Joseph Harrington), 1823-1905

Trego was in St. Louis, Missouri awaiting a boat trip to Kansas City. He describes his trip to that point as well as the weather. Trego was a doctor and he wrote about trying to locate his medicine chest for the second part of the journey. He also described his activities as he waited. It is not clear whether he had been to Kansas Territory before but he knew he was going to Sugar Mound in Linn County, Kansas Territory.

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Samuel L. Adair to Joseph Gordon

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

This is a copy of a letter written by Samuel Adair from Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. Adair thanks Reverend Gordon for $104 raised in Yellow Springs, Ohio, that was sent to James Garrison for "the benefit of sufferers in the cause of freedom in the Osawatomie vicinity." He describes the difficulties of distributing relief aid to everyone's satisfaction and mentions the Kansas Central Committee. He also writes of his concerns about how slavery and its demise will impact the nation using phrases such as "conflict of arms" and "fearful doom."

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Rachel Garrison to Samuel Adair

Garrison, Rachel A.

Rachel Garrison wrote to her cousin, Samuel Adair, that she had a little daughter two months old, which meant she was pregnant when her husband, David Garrison, was killed in the Battle of Osawatomie in August, 1856, and when she returned to Yellow Springs, Ohio. She also mentioned her other daughter, Jania. She hoped Adair could hold on to the claim the Garrisons pre-empted until it could be entered at the land office. She also listed items she would like Adair to sell for her. The same letter also contained correspondence from James Garrison.

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E. S. Whitney to Hiram Hill

Whitney, E.S.

E. S. Whitney wrote from Sumner, Kansas Territory, to her uncle, Hiram Hill. Whitney apologized for the long delay in communicating with him, and explained that her husband, Thaddeus Whitney, had been very busy lately and was doing his best to complete Hill's home. She also described her experience watching the border ruffians invade Lawrence, and her friends' and neighbors' reactions to the situation. Despite the violence and uncertainty, she was "not sorry yet" that she had come to Kansas, and told Hill that her husband would write him shortly to discuss business matters.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania of his journey to Kansas City to obtain a land warrant for Topeka and to attend the Free State Convention. Two of his articles had been published in The Herald of Freedom, a Lawrence newspaper, and he sent copies. Mentioning political difficulties, Holliday suggested that his wife wait until fall to travel to Kansas. He rented out his cabin in Topeka for profit. A deadly cholera epidemic at Fort Riley had ended.

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George Washington Brown to Eli Thayer

Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915

George Washington Brown, editor of the Herald of Freedom newspaper, was one of seven free state leaders arrested on May 14, 1856 on charges of high treason and held prisoner by federal troops near Lecompton. G. W. Brown described the sack of Lawrence and the destruction of his printing press, commented upon the harshness of his prison conditions, and asked Eli Thayer to do anything in his power to help secure his release.

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