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Thematic Time Period -- Immigration and Settlement, 1854 - 1890 (Remove)
Date -- 1880s (Remove)
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Page 1 of 4, showing 10 records out of 33 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

William Barclay (Bat) Masterson

Photograph of William Barclay (Bat) Masterson who was raised in Wichita, Kansas. Masterson was deputy sheriff in Dodge City with Wyatt Earp in 1877 and served as elected county sheriff of Ford County, Kansas, from 1877-1879.

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William Barclay "Bat" Masterson

A portrait of William Barclay "Bat" Masterson. Masterson, who was raised in Wichita, Kansas, served as deputy sheriff in Dodge City with Wyatt Earp in 1877 and served as elected county sheriff of Ford County, Kansas, from 1877-1879.

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William Barclay "Bat" Masterson

A photograph of William Barclay "Bat" Masterson. Masterson, who was raised in Wichita, Kansas, served as deputy sheriff in Dodge City with Wyatt Earp in 1877 and served as elected county sheriff of Ford County, Kansas, from 1877-1879.

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Richard West to John P. St. John

Richard West, a resident of Barton Station, Alabama, wrote this letter to Kansas governor St. John requesting information about available land in Kansas. West was a farmer who described in some detail many of the concerns facing emigrants, including transportation and other expenses. In addition to his role as governor of Kansas, St. John also served on the Board of Directors of the Kansas Freedmen?s Relief Association.

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Testimony of A. A. Harris, in report and testimony of the select committee to investigate the causes of the removal of the Negroes from the southern states to the northern states, in three parts

United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee on Negro Exodus

A. A. Harris, a white resident of Ft. Scott, Kansas, gave this brief testimony on March 29, 1880, before the Senate select committee investigating the causes of the Exodus. Harris described his contact with the black Exodusters in his area, including their difficulty finding employment. The committee also asked Harris to speak in some detail about the general treatment of African-Americans in Kansas, including any discrimination against them, particularly in the world of politics. This committee was composed of three Democratic senators and two Republican senators: Daniel W. Voorhees (Dem., Indiana), Zebulon B. Vance (Dem., North Carolina), George H. Pendleton (Dem., Ohio), William Windom (Rep., Minnesota), and Henry W. Blair (Rep., New Hampshire). Senators Blair and Vance asked the questions presented in this testimony.

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L. V. D. Tosh to Governor John A. Martin

L. V. D. Tosh, a druggist in Osage City, writes to Governor John A. Martin in Topeka asking for a clarification of the alcohol prohibition law as recently amended. Tosh asks whether a druggist can sell alcohol to a customer who provides a written statement that it is for medical, mechanical, or scientific purposes or whether a customer must have a prescription.

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H. Butterfield to Governor John A. Martin

H. Butterfield of Salem, Jewell County, Kansas, writes to Governor John A. Martin in Topeka with a list of questions about the recently amended alcohol prohibition law regulating the sale of alcohol by druggists. Butterifeld asks whether any person can sign a prescription for alcohol, whether a druggist has a right to sell alcohol to someone the druggist knows will get drunk, what can be done when the county offices will not prosecute violations of the law, whether a minor has a right to a permit as a druggist to sell alcohol, and whether a billiard hall saloon that remains open on Sundays can be declared a nuisance and prosecuted under the law. Butterfield concludes by expressing his support for prohibition and asking for better enforcement of the law.

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Barbershop, Dodge City, Kansas

This is a photo of the interior of an unidentified barber shop with barbers in view, Dodge City, Kansas.

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John Ritchie

This sepia colored carte-de-visite shows John Ritchie, (1817-1887), an abolitionist from Franklin, Indiana who moved, in 1855, to Topeka, Kansas. Actively involved in the Free State movement, Ritchie operated a way station along the underground railroad to help runway slaves. In 1858 and 1859 he respectively served as a delegate to the Leavenworth and Wyandotte Constitutional Conventions. Ritchie was also instrumental in donating a 160 acres of land for the future site of Washburn University in Topeka, Kansas.

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Henry Kuhn collection letterpress books

Kuhn, Henry, 1830-1900

Copies of correspondence both received and sent by Captain Henry Kuhn dating from after the Civil War until shortly before his death in 1898. Some of the letters are illegible. Much of the correspondence regards Kuhn's banking and other financial interests, particularly in Leavenworth, as well as other business and personal affairs, including during his time as an Indian agent in the Oklahoma area. Kuhn was county surveyor and township clerk in Atchison County, Indian agent in the Indian territory, publisher of a Marion County newspaper, and was otherwise a prominent Kansas citizen of the nineteenth century.

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