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Thematic Time Period -- Immigration and Settlement, 1854 - 1890 (Remove)
Community Life -- Clubs and organizations -- Charitable -- Relief -- National Kansas Committee (Remove)
Places -- Cities and towns (Remove)
Community Life -- Clubs and organizations -- Charitable -- Relief (Remove)
Community Life -- Clubs and organizations -- Charitable (Remove)
Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 16 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

John Brown to J. T. Cox

Brown, John, 1800-1859

In this letter dated October 7, 1858, Ottumwa, John Brown again signs himself as an agent of the National Kansas Committee and claims to have the authority to receive from Cox any money or notes, etc., received from the Committee that he might have in his possession. Brown, of course, was continuing to tap all available sources for the financing of his operations, but not every one connected with the NKC would be supportive of these particular efforts.

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National Kansas Relief Committee, minutes

National Kansas Committee

This document details the minutes of three meetings of the Kansas Relief Committee, otherwise known as the National Kansas Committee, held in 1856 on June 9th, June 21st, and June 26th. It also includes information about the membership of this emigrant aid company. The first of these meetings adopted resolutions to aid the plight of free-state settlers in Kansas Territory. Furthermore, the members of the committee decided to establish five thousand settlers in Kansas Territory and to give them a year's worth of provisions.

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A. Finch to Thaddeus Hyatt

Finch, H.

This letter, written from Osawatomie by A. Finch to Thaddeus Hyatt, chairman of the National Kansas Committee, provided general information about the inhabitants of Osawatomie and neighboring areas. It included a list of about half of the settlers residing in Osawatomie at this time, including the four pro-slavery voters. Mr. Finch went into detail about the most fertile areas that would be excellent sites for free state settlements, and about the economic conditions and financial needs of the settlers.

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Barstow Darrach to Samuel L. Adair

Darrach, Barstow

Dr. Barstow Darrach had returned to New York Hospital after being in Kansas Territory. He wrote that he felt the prospects were not very favorable for Kansas Territory. He had found "some warm friends disposed to yield Kansas to the slave power rather than resort to a revolution," and he believed [President] Buchanan would only pretend to support freedom "until the south can make sure of their prize." Darrach felt it would take a large emigration of settlers to Kansas to make it a free state, and that free state settlers would be thwarted by the "bogus authority" and "another mob from Mo." should the Free State party appear at the polls. He stated that "the strongest argument [against success] that I see is that the people do not seem prepared." He wrote that he would ship clothing, flannel cloth, and blankets to Adair by way of W. F. M. Arny in Chicago.

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W. F. M. Arny to Thaddeus Hyatt

Arny, W. F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881

W.F.M. Arny, agent of the National Kansas Committee, continues to send Thaddeus Hyatt, president of this committee, copies of letters he had received from Kansas settlers. These letters describe the economic conditions resulting from the continued drought during 1860. The reports were submitted by Rev. J. W. Fox of Ridgeway, Kansas Territory; the "Committee on the Little Osage" of Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Dr. I. W. Robinson of Manhattan, Kansas Territory; and Joseph M. Todd and others of Greenwood Township in Greenwood County, Kansas Territory.

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Testimony of Lemuel Knapp

National Kansas Committee

This testimony, recorded by the National Kansas Committee, describes the Kansas experience of Lemuel Knapp, a settler who emigrated to the area near Fort Riley, Kansas Territory. His statement includes personal information as well as comments on the development of Pawnee City and the role that it played in the early years of Kansas Territory. It also relates an account of how the President ordered the destruction of Pawnee City because the newly drawn boundaries placed it on the Fort Riley Military Reserve.

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Statement on the Central Committee

Undersigned Citizens of Kansas Territory, John Stroup (first signature),

This document, signed by Kansas Territory citizens from the Lawrence area, deplores the condition of the Central Committee's room and office. These citizens claim that they were mistreated,and that the relief effort should be placed in more benevolent hands. They ask that the National Kansas Committee "remove the present incumbents and apoint persons Who have Some feeling for poor Suffering humanity." It concludes with a list of signatures.

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Kansas--Help! Help!

Lawrence Citizen

This circular was composed of two parts. The first section was a letter written from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to the National Kansas Committee, that asked for help because of the conflict in Kansas, stating that "instant action alone can save our people from destruction." The letter briefly mentioned the recent attack on Lawrence, and the proslavery forces which were gathering and organizing. Although there was a lull in the fighting, the citizens of Lawrence were looking for assistance and relief. The second part was a response written by H. B. Hurd, secretary of the National Kansas Committee, encouraging emigration to Kansas but raising the possibility that free state settlers in the territory must at times defend their rights. He wrote that "Kansas is now in a state of open war."

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Letters from Thaddeus Hyatt. The Drouth in Kansas universal! The last crop gone! No buckwheat! No vegetables! No corn! No seed of any kind! No bread! No money! No Hope! What is to be done? (No. 3)

Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee, writes to the "New York Tribune" to make New Englanders aware of the destitution and suffering of settlers in Kansas Territory. Hyatt gives accounts of conditions in Americus and Emporia townships in Breckenridge County and also in Jackson County and Lawrence. The letter reports the condition of crops, cattle disease, etc. It contains similar information to other statements made by Kansas settlers during the drought of 1860.

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Thaddeus Hyatt's Letters from Kansas. The fact of the Drougth. Introduction of the facts, an appeal and an apology! (No. 1)

Hyatt, Thaddeus

This item is titled "Thaddeus Hyatt's Letters from Kansas, The fact of the Drougth. Introduction of the facts, an appeal and an apology! Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee, tries to dispel reports coming from Leavenworth that conditions in Kansas Territory were being exaggerated. He feels efforts to deny "the present deplorable condition of things" are motivated by economic concerns. Hyatt writes that they suffered because of the drought, not their own actions, and that the free North should aid them. The letter contains a great deal of emotional rhetoric. The letter was copied (by hand) by W. F. M. Arny. The last page of the letter describes its origins.

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