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Page 1 of 1, showing 7 records out of 7 total, starting on record 1, ending on 7

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

James Barnes Whitaker correspondence

This collection includes materials related to all aspects of James Barnes Whitaker's professional life, including his real estate business and his legal career, particularly for the pensioners he helped. He came to Tecumseh, Shawnee County in 1856 and worked there as a surveyor. In 1857, he moved to Topeka where he remained, serving as county sheriff, surveyor, and Topeka city engineer. He owned an abstract and real estate business in Topeka and was an attorney, representing numerous Civil War veterans in obtaining disability pensions, many of whom served in Kansas units. The collection consists of Whitaker's correspondence (arranged chronologically) and Whitaker's 1857 certificate of appointment as a U.S. Deputy Marshal.

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Harry Walter Colmery

This is a portrait of Harry Walter Colmery (1890-1979) dressed in his World War I uniform. Colmery was an attorney in Topeka, Kansas, an American Legion National Commander, and author of the G. I. Bill of Rights.

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Harry Walter Colmery

Allen Studios

This is a photograph of Harry Walter Colmery taken later in life.

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75,000 Legionnaires capture New York

Illustrated Current News, Inc.

These are picturegrams from the American Legion Convention in New York in 1952. "As some 3 million New Yorkers cheer their lagging footsteps, the delegates to the American Legion Convention, West Point Cadets, many bands, etc., parade on Fifth Ave. for 9 1/2 hours." 1. A zany 'Leapin Lena' gives the crowd a lot of laughs. 2. Presidential candidate Dwight D. Eisenhower, and Harry W. Colmery, march with the Kansas delegation. 3. Claude Buzich, Minneapolis, gives a reluctant policeman a great big kiss.

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Eugene Ware correspondence

This is a series of correspondence to and from Eugene Fitch Ware (1841-1911). Ware moved to Fort Scott, Kansas, after the Civil War and became employed at the Fort Scott Monitor. In 1879, Ware began the first of three terms in the Kansas State Senate. During his terms of office, Ware introduced bills concerning railroads, life insurance, militia, and relief and support of the poor as well as bills of a more local nature. Ware moved to Topeka in 1893 to become a partner with Charles Gleed and his brother, James, forming the law firm of Gleed, Ware and Gleed. In addition to journalism, law, and politics, Ware used the pseudonym, Ironquill, for his literary and poetic achievements. His works include "Neutralia" and "The Rhymes of Ironquill". For a complete contents list of the papers of Eugene Fitch Ware, see the External Links below.

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Harry Walter Colmery

Underwood & Underwood

This is a formal portrait of Harry Walter Colmery (1890-1979), who was an attorney in Topeka, Kansas, the National Commander of the American Legion, and the author of the G. I. Bill of Rights.

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Several members of the "first team" that helped create and pass the first GI Bill

These thirteen members of the "first team" quarterbacked the creation and passage of the first GI Bill. Front row left to right: Lyon W. Brandon (Miss.); Roane Waring (Tenn.); Rep. John Gibson (Ga.); Harry W Colmery (Kan.); Pat Kelley (Ga.); Frank Reilly (Mass.). Back row: Frank Sullivan (D.C.); John Stlle (Ill.); Divid Camelon (NY); Sam Rorex (Ark.); Jack Cejnar (Ind.); and T. O. Kraabel (N.Dak.). Copied from The American Legion Magazine, January, 1969, Volume 86, Number 1, page 27.

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