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Page 1 of 4, showing 10 records out of 35 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

A.S. Wilson to Henry J. Allen

Kansas. Governor (1919-1923 : Allen)

A.S. Wilson, an attorney in Galena, Kansas, writes to Governor Henry J. Allen to indicate his interest in a law that would allow second class cities to separate the schools based on "white and colored children." He included a petition with signatures with the letter.

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David J. Brewer and C. B. Brace to William Kincaid

Brewer, David J. (David Josiah), 1837-1910

A letter written by David J. Brewer and C. B. Brace, Leavenworth, Kansas, to Reverend William Kincaid, minister of the Congregational Church in Rushville, New York, encouraging him to become the minister of the First Congregational Church in Leavenworth, Kansas. The letter describes the church and invites Rev. Kincaid to spend time with the congregation. He accepted the position and served from the fall of 1870 through January, 1876. Brewer was a lawyer. During his distinguished legal career, he was a Kansas Supreme Court Justice,1871 - 1884, United States Circuit Court Justice, 1884 - 1889, and United States Supreme Court Justice, 1889 - 1910.

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Jonathan Crews to Thomas Nesbit Stinson

Crews, Jonathan

Jonathan Crews, writing from LaPorte, Indiana, expressed strong proslavery views on the situation in Kansas. Crews described his trip home to Indiana from Kansas and discussed several Indiana court cases involving his business interests.

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Walter Augustus Huxman

This black and white photograph shows Governor Walter Huxman during his inaugural parade along Sixth & Kansas in Topeka, Kansas. Huxman, a Democrat, was elected on November 3, 1936, as the twenty-seventh governor of Kansas, from 1937 to 1930. Failing to be reelected in 1939, Huxman was nominated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth District. He held this position until stepping down in 1962.

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Walter Augustus Huxman

This black and white photograph shows Walter Augustus Huxman, (1887-1972) possibly standing in the bucket of a large mine or quarrying shovel. He established his career as a public official by serving as Reno County's assistant attorney from 1915 to 1919, and later as the city attorney of Hutchinson, Kansas from 1919 to 1921. He was elected on November 3, 1936, as the twenty-seventh governor of Kansas. Failing to be reelected in 1939, Huxman was nominated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth District. He held this position until stepping down in 1962.

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George Henry Hoyt

A portrait of George Henry Hoyt, a resident of Leavenworth, Kansas. He served as Kansas Attorney General from 1867 to 1869. During the Civil War, he was Captain of Company K, Seventh Kansas Volunteer Cavalry and promoted to Lieutenant Colonel of the Fifteenth Kansas Volunteer Cavalry.

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Walter Augustus Huxman

This black and white photograph shows Governor Walter Huxman and Virgil Patterson on horseback in Anthony, Kansas. Elected on November 3, 1936, as the twenty-seventh governor of Kansas, he served one term from 1937 to 1939. Failing to be reelected, Huxman was nominated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth District. He held this position until stepping down in 1962.

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Wilson Shannon to John A. Halderman

Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877

Wilson Shannon was an Ohio Democrat who preceded John W. Geary as governor of Kansas Territory (August 1856--August 1857) and was considered a proslave partisan. Shanon writes John Halderman from Lecompton, Kansas Territory, regarding some legal matters--specifically, "some land warrants" being sent to Halderman in Leavenworth. Attorney John Halderman was trusted and respected by men on both the anti- and pro-slavery sides.

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Knox & Kellogg to James B. Abbott

Attorneys Knox & Kellogg wrote from St. Louis to James Abbott in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, responding to a lawsuit brought against them by Samuel Cabot. Cabot held them responsible for the long delay in returning several rifles that had been stolen from him the previous spring by Missouri "Highwaymen." Knox and Kellogg reported to Abbott, acting as agent for Cabot, that the lawsuit had been dismissed and the damage to the rifles was to be appraised by a third party.

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Elisha J. Scott

Elisha J. Scott, 1890-1963, was raised in Topeka's Tennesseetown. As a youth, he possessed a strong drive and a quick wit, which attracted the eye of prominent Topeka minister Charles M. Sheldon. With financial support from Sheldon and his own abilities to succeed, Scott earned his law degree from Washburn College in 1916. During his long career as an attorney, he argued many civil rights and school segregation cases throughout Kansas and the Midwest. Two of Scott's sons, John and Charles, joined him in his law firm of Scott, Scott, Scott, and Jackson. Together they helped to prosecute, at the local level, the landmark civil rights case of Brown v. Topeka Board of Education.

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