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Page 1 of 6, showing 10 records out of 55 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Resolution of the Kansas and Nebraska Annual Conference

This copy of a resolution, drafted by the Kansas and Nebraska Annual Conference of Omaha City, Nebraska Territory, resolved to approve the efforts of the Trustees of Bluemont Cental College in Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to "erect a noble college edifice" and to support Isaac Goodnow's continuation as Agent.

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Franklin D. Murphy and Dean J.A. Nelson

A black and white photograph of Franklin D. Murphy the chancellor elect of the University of Kansas with acting chancellor Dean J. A. Nelson. Murphy served as the ninth chancellor of the University of Kansas from 1951 to 1960, before becoming the chancellor of the University of California at Los Angeles in 1960.

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William Marion Jardine

A photograph of William Marion Jardine who served as Secretary of Agriculture during the presidency of Calvin Coolidge. As one of the first Kansans to gain a cabinet level position at the national level, he was instrumental in directing a farm program that had become economically depressed during the post World War I period. Prior to his selection to this cabinet level position he had served as Dean of the School of Agriculture at Kansas State Agricultural College (Kansas State University) and subsequently became president of that institution from 1918 - 1925. Following his tenure as Secretary of Agriculture, President Hoover appointed Jardine as Ambassador to Egypt in 1930. Upon his return to this country in 1933, Gov. Alf Landon appointed him a temporary Kansas State Treasurer in the wake of the Finney Bond Scandal. Jardine resigned from that position in April 1934 and became the president of the University of Wichita (now Wichita State University).

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Men [and women] of Kansas

Topeka Capital

This volume is a collection of portraits of Kansas business owners, professionals, public officials, and politicians in 1905. Despite its title, this volume does include women also. The women included are physicians, osteopaths, and educators. The professions covered include: educators, clergy, lawyers, bankers, real estate, life insurance, lodge officials, architects, postmasters, physicians, dentists, artists, telephones, utilities, merchants, manufacturers, osteopathy, U.S. marshals, government officials, editors and publishers, railroads, military, and photographers. A name index begins on page 633 and it is also reproduced under Text Version below.

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Victims of Quantrill's raid

Cordley, Richard

A composite of portraits showing Dr. J. F. Griswold, Harlow W. Baker, Josiah Trask, and Simeon Montgomery Thorp. These men were victims of Quantrill's raid in Lawrence, Kansas. It was copied from A History of Lawrence, Kansas, by Richard Cordley who himself experienced and survived Quantrill's raid.

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T. M. Eddy to the Officers of _____ R.R.

Eddy, T.M.

This letter written by T. M. Eddy, is an example of many letters of introduction written on the behalf of Isaac Goodnow. Goodnow, recently emigrated to Kansas Territory, was traveling extensively in the East in order to raise money for the construction of a new college in Manhattan. He succeeded in founding Bluemont College, which was a precursor to Kansas State University. Letters like these would have increased Goodnow's credibility when meeting new potential investors.

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Isaac Tichenor Goodnow to Quereau

Goodnow, Isaac T. (Isaac Tichenor), 1814-1894

Isaac Goodnow wrote from Kansas Territory to a friend Quereau of New England. It appeared that Goodnow was growing tired of the hard -scrabble life in the Territory, which was "decidedly injurious" to his constitution. He also showed signs of discouragement regarding the founding of a college in K.T., resigned to the idea that "for the time to come little can be done educationally." Goodnow told Quereau that he was actively seeking a teaching job back in the States.

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Ernest Hiram Lindley

This black and white photograph shows Ernest Hiram Lindley, (1869-1940), the seventh chancellor of the University of Kansas, (1920-1939). During his first few years as chief executive officer he successfully secured $3.5 million dollars from the Kansas Legislature for building appropriations. With these funds a number of buildings were constructed across campus including: Hoch Auditorium, Strong Hall, Watson Library and the women's first dormitory, Corbin Hall. He was also instrumental in expanding the school's instructional offerings by establishing a school of business, and a school of chemical engineering and preventive medicine. For nineteen years Lindley served as the chancellor of the University of Kansas, longer than anyone before him. However, after enduring a number of difficult years with the State Board of Administration over employment practices, he resigned on June 30, 1939. A year later, the seventy-year old educator became ill while traveling abroad. He later died, on August 21, 1940, aboard the passenger liner Asama Maru with burial conducted at sea.

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Mary Bailey Sweet

This black and white photograph shows Mary Bailey Sweet benefactress of Washburn University in Topeka Kansas. The daughter of Timothy Bailey Sweet and Annie Brown Sweet she graduated from the College of Sisters of Bethany in Topeka and was valedictorian of the class of 1898. Mary attended Washburn College from 1900-1901, as a music student before graduating from the University of Kansas in 1903. After graduation, she taught at the Methodist Deaconess Training School in Chicago from 1903 to 1910 and later at the Methodist School for Girls in Rome, Italy from 1912 to 1914. During her stay in Italy Mary also worked with the Red Cross assisting with World War I efforts. At the close of the war, Mary returned to the United States to teach at the Methodist Deaconess school in Seattle, Washington where she taught for several years before returning to Topeka, Kansas. Mary became an active member of the community and to Washburn College. In 1952, Mary and her sisters Susie and Annie established the Sweet Foundation in memory of their brother Paul. The endowment provides scholarships to young men and women who attend Washburn. In 1955 Mary established the Sweet Summer Sabbatical Fund. With this endowment faculty at the university are given the opportunity to broaden their teaching experiences during the summer months through travel and research. Mary's commitment to education also extended into the community. She taught adult Sunday School classes at the First Methodist Church and was a member of numerous organizations including the Kansas Authors Club, and the Topeka Art Guild. Mary died on April 3, 1964 at the age of eighty-five.

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Mamie Luella Williams

Portrait of Mamie Luella Williams, 1894-1986, an elementary school teacher and principal in Topeka, Kansas. In 1965 she was appointed to the Kansas Commission on the Status of Women, served as a delegate to the 1971 White House Conference on Aging, and was active on the Senior Citizens Advisory Council for the Republican Party for Kansas, 1974-1976. She received the Washburn University Distinguished Service Award in 1973, and an honorary doctorate in mathematics from Washburn in 1982. Williams Science and Fine Arts Elementary Magnet School at 1301 S.E. Monroe, Topeka, Kansas, was named in honor of Ms. Williams.

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