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Page 1 of 4, showing 10 records out of 40 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Governor Andrew Shoeppel doctor shortage correspondence

Kansas. Governor (1943-1947 : Schoeppel)

This correspondence between Governor Schoeppel and various individuals, including Senator Arthur Capper, addresses the serious shortage of medical doctors in Kansas in the later summer of 1945. Because of the urgent need for trained medical personnel during World War II, thousands of doctors either joined the military or worked in military-run facilities. As a result, many states found themselves lacking the medical personnel that they needed to take care of the civilians not directly involved in fighting the war.

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Dr. John R. Brinkley

This black and white photograph shows Dr. John R. Brinkley, wife Minnie, and son Johnnie Boy. Brinkley a physician from Milford, Kansas became famous for his goat gland transplants and unconventional medical practice.

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Andrew Jackson Huntoon correspondence

Huntoon, Andrew Jackson, d. 1902

Andrew Jackson Huntoon was a physician who came to Kansas in 1857, settling south of Topeka in Williamsport, Shawnee County. In 1861 he enlisted with the 5th Kansas Cavalry volunteer regiment, serving as assistant surgeon and surgeon of that group, seeing service along the Missouri border and in Arkansas. After mustering out he settled in Topeka, where he died in 1902. This collection consists primarily of letters to or from Lizzie, Huntoon's friend and later wife. Some of the content describes Indian affairs and military matters. A complete transcription is available by clicking "Text Version" below.

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Men [and women] of Kansas

Topeka Capital

This volume is a collection of portraits of Kansas business owners, professionals, public officials, and politicians in 1905. Despite its title, this volume does include women also. The women included are physicians, osteopaths, and educators. The professions covered include: educators, clergy, lawyers, bankers, real estate, life insurance, lodge officials, architects, postmasters, physicians, dentists, artists, telephones, utilities, merchants, manufacturers, osteopathy, U.S. marshals, government officials, editors and publishers, railroads, military, and photographers. A name index begins on page 633 and it is also reproduced under Text Version below.

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Johnston Lykins

Johnston Lykins was a well-known missionary, physician, and translator who worked with the Pottawatomi and Shawnee Indians who had moved to Indian Territory (present-day Kansas) after the passage of the Indian Removal Act in 1830. In 1831, after serving as a missionary to the Indian tribes in Indiana and Michigan, Lykins and his first wife Delilah (McCoy) Lykins moved to Indian Territory. Lykins and his father-in-law, Isaac McCoy, established the Shawnee Indian Baptist Mission in present-day Johnson County, Kansas. In addition to his responsibilities as a physician, Lykins worked as a translator and developed a system of Indian orthography that allowed the Shawnee people to read and write in their native language. He edited and published the first paper printed in Shawnee, called the Sinwiowe Kesibwi (Shawnee Sun). In the spring of 1843, Lykins founded a mission among the Pottawatomi near what is today Topeka. Due, perhaps, to inter-denominational conflicts and other problems with the mission, Lykins left the Pottawatomi mission and moved to Kansas City, Missouri. He served as the second mayor of Kansas City in 1854, and he remained in residence there until his death in 1876.

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Medical history of the 19th Regiment, Kansas Cavalry Volunteers

Bailey, Mahlon

Mahlon Bailey, the regimental surgeon, recorded this medical history of the 19th Kansas Cavalry. This history includes information on the hasty physicals given to new recruits, wounds received in battle, and other medical problems encountered on the trail, as well as general information about the day-to-day activities of the soldiers. Located at the end of the report is a chart detailing the medical problems of the regiment, including the number of cases of dysentery, gonorrhea, pneumonia, ulcers, burns, and sprains (among many others). At the end of these charts, Bailey expresses his appreciation to the commanders of the regiment, thanking them for following his medical advice and showing concern for the health of their soldiers.

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Joseph Harrington Trego to an unidentified recipient [probably his wife, Alice Trego]

Trego, Joseph H. (Joseph Harrington), 1823-1905

Trego was in St. Louis, Missouri awaiting a boat trip to Kansas City. He describes his trip to that point as well as the weather. Trego was a doctor and he wrote about trying to locate his medicine chest for the second part of the journey. He also described his activities as he waited. It is not clear whether he had been to Kansas Territory before but he knew he was going to Sugar Mound in Linn County, Kansas Territory.

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William A. Hammond to Andrew H. Reeder

Hammond, William Alexander, 1828-1900

Dr. William A. Hammond, secretary of the Pawnee town company, was post surgeon at Fort Riley, Kansas Territory, in 1854-55. He writes from the "Catholic Mission" (probably the Potawatomi mission at St. Mary's) to inform Governor Andrew H. Reeder that he has "just purchased from Mr. Wilson one whole interest (10 shares), and from Lt. Hunter one half an interest (5 shares)" for Reeder for a total cost of $1,800.00.

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Dr. Samuel Wendell Williston

Photo of Dr. Samuel Wendell Williston, 1851-1918, born in Boston and moved to Kansas in 1857. He attended Kansas State Agricultural College, Manhattan, and Yale University. He was appointed as professor of geology and anatomy and dean of the medical department at the University of Kansas, Lawrence, and helped to establish the KU medical school and served on the Kansas Board of Health. He did not practice medicine but was involved in establishing licensing requirements for medical practitioners. Dr. Williston collected fossils and entered into extensive paleontological research and was involved in the development of a major fossil collection at the university's Dyche Museum. With his interest in archeology, though not an archeologist by training, he made significant contributions to Kansas archeology which included work at the El Cuartelejo pueblo site and the Twelve Mile Creek Paleoindian site.

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Dr. John R. Brinkley

Dr. John R. Brinkley, a physician from Milford, Kansas, famous for his goat gland transplants.

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