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Date -- 1861-1869 (Remove)
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Page 1 of 15, showing 10 records out of 146 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok

This formal portrait take in Hays, Kansas shows James Butler " Wild Bill" Hickok, 1837-1876. The legendary lawman and gun-slinger begins his career in 1858 as peace officer of the Monticello Township in the Kansas Territory of Johnson County. For a number of years Hickok also works as a government scout, guide and deputy U.S. marshal across the Great Plains. His reputation as a skilled marksman proceeds him wherever he went. In 1869 Hickok is elected marshal of Hays, Kansas and sheriff of Ellis County, Kansas. A role he serves until 1870. In 1871, he is hired as Abilene, Kansas' town marshal. As marshal he earns fame for being a quick draw and for spending most of his time playing cards. Hickok is killed on August 01, 1876 while playing a game of poker at a saloon in the Deadwood, Dakota Territory.

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Proclamation Activating the 19th Kansas Volunteer Regiment

Crawford, S. J. (Samuel Johnson), 1835-1913

This proclamation, signed by Governor Samuel J. Crawford in 1868, activated the 19th Kansas Volunteer Regiment. This regiment was created specifically to fight in any impending conflicts between native tribes and the U.S. government. According to this proclamation, the 19th Kansas would be composed of five companies of cavalry (80 to 100 each) serving for a period of three months.

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Thomas Ewing, Jr., to Joseph J. Coombs

Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896

In January 1861 Ewing wrote several letters to members of Congress and others of influence in Washington on behalf of Charles Robinson's appointment as Commissioner of Indian Affairs. This one, marked "Private," to J. J. Coombs is one example. Not only was Robinson well qualified for this important position, according to Ewing, but Robinson's appointment to this influential post would increase Ewing's chance to capture a Senate seat--"If he can get the appt before the State Legislature sits it will so greatly strengthen his influence that my election will be certain."

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Thomas Ewing, Jr., to Governor Charles Robinson

Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896

This brief letter to Charles Robinson in Lawrence was to inform the "governor" of Ewing's activities on his behalf and to send him a copy of one of the half dozen or so letters Ewing had written in support of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs appointment. Letters reportedly went to Caleb B. Smith; John Sherman; Governors T. Corwin, William Dennison, and Salmon Chase; Joseph J. Coombs; and "Father," Thomas Ewing, Sr.

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Thomas Ewing, Jr., to General James H. Lane

Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896

In this "Private" reply to his political rival, Ewing apparently responded to a request from Jim Lane for information about troops and munitions at Fort Leavenworth. Ewing provided some detailed information about this and about the local militia's readiness and strength. The troop strength at the fort was weak, but "Dragoons" from Fort Scott were expected soon: "If the Cavalry Companies come, all will be safe at the Fort. But we must have a force prepared to defend the City--& such preparation is our best guaranty for peace with our neighbors.

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Kansas Relief Committee, newspaper article

Smith, I. N.

This article, published in the Haverhill, Massachusetts Tri-Weekly Publisher, lists the contributions collected by their local Kansas Relief Committee. A number of different churches in the area donated cash, and the committee also sent varied articles of clothing (listed in the article) to General S.C. Pomeroy of Atchison.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote to Mary from Chicago, Illinois, one stop along his journey to Washington, D. C. where he would lobby Congress for assistance with the Atchison and Topeka Railroad. He gave details of his journey and mentioned several people he had or planned to visit en route to Washington. Kansas Territory was suffering an especially severe winter.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from La Porte, Indiana to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Topeka, Kansas Territory. On his way to Washington, D. C. he planned to collect a debt. A friend had given him railway passes to Pittsburgh. The contrast between the quality of life in the northern states and Kansas Territory saddened Cyrus, who quoted a verse. He gave instructions to Mary concerning the livestock and farmland. In a postscript, he emphasized that she save the eyes of potatoes.

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Mary Dillon Holliday to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

Holliday, Mary Dillon, 1833-1908

Mary Holliday wrote from Topeka to her husband, Cyrus K. Holliday, in Washington, D. C. She described farm and financial difficulties, especially her frustration with John, an incompetent hired hand. She also considered releasing her "girl" to save money and taking in Sister Tite as an unpaid but potentially helpful guest. Mary requested instructions concerning lumber, asked for seeds and carpets, and mentioned local happenings. She hoped that the statehood of Kansas would encourage Cyrus to return quickly. The letter has no signature.

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John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

In Lawrence on January 19, 1861, attending the meeting of what proved to be the last territorial legislature, Ingalls wrote about everyone's interest in happenings outside the territory: namely, congressional action on the "Kansas Admission Bill" and the "Pacific Rail Road Bill," as well as "the condition of affairs of the South ['the secession movement']. Especially bad weather--"the snow is quite deep and the temperature below zero constantly"--had left Kansas somewhat isolated, and as they waited for news the legislature was "not doing much except discussing Union resolutions, endorsing Major [Robert] Anderson [commander of U.S. troops at Fort Sumter], and divorcing Every body that applies for rupture of the bonds of matrimony."

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