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Thematic Time Period -- Bleeding Kansas, 1854 - 1861 (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions (Remove)
Type of Material -- Photographs (Remove)
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Page 1 of 11, showing 10 records out of 101 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

John Gideon Haskell

Waite, Steven H.

This cabinet card shows John Gideon Haskell, (1832-1907), Civil War veteran and architect for the state of Kansas. He migrated to Lawrence, Kansas, in the summer of 1857, to begin his architectural career but a severe drought and the start of the Civil War put his future plans on hold. In July of 1861, Haskell was mustered into service as assistant quartermaster general of Kansas and he was appointed as quartermaster for the Third Kansas and the Tenth Kansas Volunteers. He, also, served as assistant quartermaster on the staff of General James Blunt and later became chief quartermaster of the Army of the Frontier. After the war, Haskell resumed his profession with the appointment, in 1866, as the architect for the state of Kansas. During his tenure, he designed the east wing of the Kansas Capitol and was responsible for overseeing the entire construction of the capitol. In addition to his responsibilities at the statehouse, Haskell was the chief architect for the Chase County Courthouse, the Douglas County Courthouse and many of the buildings at the University of Kansas. In 1907, after a long and successful career, John Gideon Haskell passed away at the age of seventy-five after a sudden illness at his home in Lawrence, Kansas.

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Alfred Larzelere

Alfred Larzelere of Doniphan County was active in free state politics. He served as speaker of the Kansas House in 1859 and as a delegate to the Leavenworth constitutional convention. He was also a member of the Free State Central committee.

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George Washington Brown

A portrait of George Washington Brown, who in the autumn of 1854 moved to Lawrence, Kansas Territory where he settled with a group of New England emigrants. By October of that year he had constructed a building and became editor of one of the first free-state newspapers in the territory, the Herald of Freedom, the organ of the New England Emigrant Aid Company. The newspaper angered the proslavery forces in the territory. On May 21, 1856, a proslavery posse led by the notorious Douglas County sheriff, Samuel J. Jones arrested Brown and sacked and burned Lawrence. Brown spent four months incarcerated following an indictment by a proslavery grand jury for high treason. Later his case was dismissed without trial for want of cause for prosecution. He returned to Lawrence to rebuild his business and resume the publication of the Herald of Freedom. In the capacity of editor he served until the last issue of the newspaper on December 17, 1859. Brown?s interests included the founding of the city of Emporia and oil. In 1860 Brown drilled three wells in Miami County and began to extract oil. He finally decided to leave Kansas in 1865 for the more lucrative oil fields of Pennsylvania. His stay in Pennsylvania was brief, however, and by the end of the year he had journeyed to Rockford, Illinois, where he decided to take up permanent residence. Brown died there on February 5, 1915, at the age of ninety-four.

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Hugh A. Cook

A cased daguerreotype of Hugh A. Cook, 1827 -1901, sheriff of Franklin County, Kansas.

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Ephraim Nute

Portrait of Rev. Ephraim Nute. He was a Unitarian minister in Lawrence, Kansas Territory. Nute served as chaplain for the Territorial Legislature at Lecompton and was a chaplain for the First Regiment of the Kansas Volunteers.

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Eli Thayer

Portrait of Eli Thayer, 1819-1899, who in 1853-54 was a representative in the Massachusetts legislature and while there, originated and organized the New England Emigrant Aid Company. He worked to combine the northern states in support of his plan to send antislavery settlers into Kansas. Lawrence, Topeka, Manhattan, and Ossawatomie, Kansas, were settled under the auspices of his company.

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Samuel D. Lecompte's oath of office

This is a photograph of record of the oath taken by Samuel D. Lecompte as Chief Justice of the Kansas Territory. He was sworn in by Territorial Governor Andrew Reeder. The page also contain an oath for T. W. Hays as constable for the Third District. It was sworn before Daniel Woodson, secretary, on December 6, 1854.

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James Henry Lane

Leonard, J. H.

Portrait of James Henry Lane, 1814-1866, United States senator from Kansas, 1861-1866.

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Charles H. Lovejoy

A studio portrait of Charles Haseltine Lovejoy, who came to the Kansas Territory in 1855 with his wife, Julia Louisa Hardy Lovejoy, and children. Reverend Lovejoy was the second traveling Methodist preacher in the territory. The Lovejoys built the first house on the Manhattan Town Company site, but moved to a farm near Baldwin, Kansas Territory, in 1857.

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Frederick Douglass

Portrait of Frederick Douglass, 1818-1895, who was an African-American leader in the abolitionist movement, a speaker, and an author.

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