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Thematic Time Period -- Bleeding Kansas, 1854 - 1861 (Remove)
Date -- 1854-1860 (Remove)
Type of Material -- Photographs (Remove)
Date (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions (Remove)
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Page 1 of 5, showing 10 records out of 42 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Alfred Larzelere

Alfred Larzelere of Doniphan County was active in free state politics. He served as speaker of the Kansas House in 1859 and as a delegate to the Leavenworth constitutional convention. He was also a member of the Free State Central committee.

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George Washington Brown

A portrait of George Washington Brown, who in the autumn of 1854 moved to Lawrence, Kansas Territory where he settled with a group of New England emigrants. By October of that year he had constructed a building and became editor of one of the first free-state newspapers in the territory, the Herald of Freedom, the organ of the New England Emigrant Aid Company. The newspaper angered the proslavery forces in the territory. On May 21, 1856, a proslavery posse led by the notorious Douglas County sheriff, Samuel J. Jones arrested Brown and sacked and burned Lawrence. Brown spent four months incarcerated following an indictment by a proslavery grand jury for high treason. Later his case was dismissed without trial for want of cause for prosecution. He returned to Lawrence to rebuild his business and resume the publication of the Herald of Freedom. In the capacity of editor he served until the last issue of the newspaper on December 17, 1859. Brown?s interests included the founding of the city of Emporia and oil. In 1860 Brown drilled three wells in Miami County and began to extract oil. He finally decided to leave Kansas in 1865 for the more lucrative oil fields of Pennsylvania. His stay in Pennsylvania was brief, however, and by the end of the year he had journeyed to Rockford, Illinois, where he decided to take up permanent residence. Brown died there on February 5, 1915, at the age of ninety-four.

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Samuel D. Lecompte's oath of office

This is a photograph of record of the oath taken by Samuel D. Lecompte as Chief Justice of the Kansas Territory. He was sworn in by Territorial Governor Andrew Reeder. The page also contain an oath for T. W. Hays as constable for the Third District. It was sworn before Daniel Woodson, secretary, on December 6, 1854.

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James Henry Lane

Leonard, J. H.

Portrait of James Henry Lane, 1814-1866, United States senator from Kansas, 1861-1866.

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Henry Ward Beecher

Mora, J. M.

Portrait of Henry Ward Beecher,1813-1887. Beecher was a prominent, theologically liberal American Congregationalist clergyman and social reformer, and famous speaker who was born in Litchfield, Connecticut, the son of famous evangelist Lyman Beecher and brother to Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of Uncle Tom's Cabin. Another well-known sister was Isabella Beecher Hooker, a suffragist. He also had a brother, Charles Beecher, who was a renowned Congregationalist minister. Henry Ward Beecher and his congregation in the East contributed Sharp's carbines and Bibles to the Beecher Bible Rifle Colony in Wabaunsee, Kan.

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James Henry Lane

Leonard, J. H.

Portrait of James Henry Lane, 1814-1866, United States senator from Kansas, 1861-1866.

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James Henry Lane, United States Senator from Kansas

Portrait of James Henry Lane, 1814-1866, United States Senator from Kansas, 1861-1866.

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Samuel J. Reader

Samuel J. Reader lived in Shawnee County, Kansas Territory, and participated in some free state activities. He wrote about his daily life (including descriptions of the Battles of Indianola and Hickory Point) in his diary, which he used as the basis for an autobiography he illustrated with drawings and watercolor paintings. This photograph is a copy that Reader made from a daguerreotype taken of him in 1855 at age eighteen. The copy was produced on March 1, 1894, in La Harpe, Hancock County, Illinois.

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William Hutchinson

Clinedinst

A portrait of William Hutchinson, a journalist and correspondent for the New York Times, Chicago Tribune, St. Louis Democrat and Washington Republic, he covered events in Kansas from 1855 through the early 1860s. He settled in Lawrence, Kansas Territory. Hutchinson served as secretary of the Kansas Central Committee and assisted with efforts to send emigrant parties and relief to Kansas Territory. He was first identified with the abolition or free-soil party, until the Republican party organized. Hutchinson was a member of the Wyandotte Constitution Convention and was an early and persistent advocate of temperance and other reforms.

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Samuel Clarke Pomeroy

A portrait of Samuel Clarke Pomeroy, businessman and politician. In 1859, he attended the Convention at Osawatomie and the Republican Convention at Lawrence. Pomeroy was elected president of the Kansas Relief Committee in November, 1860. After statehood, he served as United States Senator from April 4, 1861 to March 3, 1873.

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