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Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 24 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

William Henry Avery

A portrait of Governor William Henry Avery seated at his desk in the Kansas Capitol. He was born August 11, 1911 near Wakefield, Kansas, and graduated from Wakefield High School and the University of Kansas. A Republican, Avery served in the Kansas House of Representatives from 1950 to 1955. In 1954, he was elected to the United States House of Representatives and served until 1964. During his 10 years in Congress, he served on numerous committees. In 1964, Avery was elected the 37th governor of Kansas. He served one term as governor, losing a re-election bid to Robert Docking in 1966. After an unsuccessful bid for the United States Senate, Avery returned to private life.

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William Howard Taft campaigning for President, Newton, Kansas

This sepia colored photograph shows William Howard Taft, the Republican candidate for the U.S. Presidency, speaking to the crowd at the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company depot in Newton, Kansas. Standing to the left of Taft is the U.S. Senator from Kansas Charles Curtis. Taft won the November election by defeating the Democratic candidate William Jennings Bryan to become the twenty-seventh President of the United States.

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President Gerald Ford, Topeka, Kansas

These four black and white photographs show the thirty-eighth President of the United States Gerald R. Ford speaking to an estimated crowd of 12,500 people on the east steps of the capitol in Topeka, Kansas. Prior to this address, he spoke to a joint session of the Kansas legislature about his economic and energy programs. Later in the day, the president met with ten Midwest governors at Cedar Crest for a working luncheon to discuss proposals for strengthening the nation's economy and reducing America's dependency on Middle-East oil.

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Governor and Mrs. William Henry Avery

Governor and Mrs. William Henry Avery hosting a reception at Cedar Crest, Topeka, Kansas.

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George Docking

This is an informal portrait of Governor George Docking, 1904-1964, sitting at his desk signing paperwork at the Statehouse in Topeka, Kansas. Docking, a native of Clay Center, Kansas, served as a Democratic governor of Kansas from 1957 to 1961. His son, Robert B. Docking, 1925-1983, served as a Democratic governor of Kansas from 1967 to 1975.

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Governor and Mrs. William Henry Avery at Cedar Crest, Topeka, Kansas

A photograph showing Governor and Mrs. William Henry Avery in the living room of Cedar Crest in Topeka, Kansas. Avery was born August 11, 191, near Wakefield, Kansas, and graduated from Wakefield High School and the University of Kansas. In 1964, Avery was elected the 37th governor of Kansas. He served one term as governor, losing a re-election bid to Robert Docking in 1966.

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Populist members of the Dunsmore House at the Kansas Statehouse

Farrow, W. F.

This group picture, taken during or after the Legislative War of 1893, depicts the members of the Dunsmore House (Populist), and a few women and children, standing on the statehouse steps in Topeka, Kansas. The validity of the election of 1893 had been called in question, and thus two houses, the Douglass House (Republican) and Dunsmore House (Populist), both occupied Representative Hall and claimed to be the legally elected legislative body. On February 13, 1893, the Populist Dunsmore House barricaded the hall and prevented the Republican congressmen from entering the chambers. The Republican Douglass house responded by attacking the doors of the hall with sledgehammers. The Douglass House then recruited six hundred guards (called sergeants-at-arms) to guard the hall, refusing an order from Governor Lorenzo Lewelling to vacate the premises. Finally, on the night of February 16, the ousted Populists agreed to wait for the verdict from the Supreme Court while the Republicans maintained control of the House, and on February 25, the Supreme Court affirmed the validity of the Republican House. This event, although it lasted only twelve days, came to be known as the Legislative War or the Populist War.

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Debbie Bryant with Governor and Mrs. William Avery

A photograph showing Debbie Bryant, Miss America 1966, posed on the stairs of Cedar Crest with Governor and Mrs. William Henry Avery and military officers.

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Millard F. Marks' residence, Valley Falls, Kansas

A photograph showing Dr. and Mrs. Millard F. Marks standing in front of their residence. Visible is his carriage and team parked on the street. In addition to his medical practice, he was a Populist and served as a member of the 1897-1899 Kansas House of Representatives from District 5.

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Governor John William Carlin

Photograph of Governor John Carlin in his office at the Kansas Capitol in Topeka, Kansas.

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