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Page 1 of 22, showing 10 records out of 220 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Kansas State Capitol building, Topeka, Kansas, 1867

Gardner, Alexander, 1821-1882

This stereograph shows the Kansas State Capitol building under construction in Topeka, Shawnee County, Kansas, in 1867. The photograph shows scaffolding, workers, building stone, and a portion of the completed first floor. The stereograph is from Alexander Gardner's series, "Across the Continent on the Union Pacific Railway, Eastern Division," and includes the notation "351 miles west of St. Louis Mo."

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Menninger family, Topeka, Kansas

This informal portrait of members of the Menninger family was taken at Oakwood, home of Dr. C.F. and Flo in Topeka, Kansas. Those present are identified (from left to right) as Dr. William Menninger, Edwin Menninger, Flo Menninger and her husband Dr. C. F. Menninger, and Dr. Karl Menninger. Dr. C. F. Menninger, with sons Will and Karl, founded the Menninger Clinic, which was the nation's first group psychiatry practice, in 1925 in Topeka, Kansas.

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William Inge's childhood home, Independence, Kansas

William Inge's childhood home, located at 514 N. 4th Street in Independence, Kansas.

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Birger Sandzen

This is an informal portrait of artist Birger Sandzen, 1871-1954, seated in his Lindsborg, Kansas, study with samples of his artwork and art collection.

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John Steuart Curry

John Steuart Curry standing on a ladder by the "Tragic Prelude" mural.

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Ephriam Nute, Jr. to Reverend Edward Everett Hale

Nute, Ephraim

Ephraim Nute, a Unitarian minister writing from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to Edward Everett Hale, described the natural environment, economic developments, politics, religious affairs, and daily life in the territory. Nute commented on the need for more saw mills, efforts to construct a church, prospects for "free-thinking Christianity," and the possibility of armed conflict in the territory.

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Thomas Bickerton testimony

Hyatt, Thaddeus

This testimony, taken down by Thaddeus Hyatt as part of the Journal of Investigations in Kansas, is divided into two parts. It begins with descriptions of his life before he came to Kansas Territory and his efforts to set up a claim outside of Lawrence, including his technique for building his sod house. Thomas Bickerton was a well traveled individual and an influential commander of a free state artillery company. He was involved in skirmishes with border ruffians and in the attack on Franklin. Also, General James Lane sent him to Kansas City to obtain a brass howitzer (later known as the Abbott howitzer) for use against the proslavery forces.

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William Beh, testimony

Hyatt, Thaddeus

This testimony, presumably from the Journal of Investigations in Kansas, was most likely recorded on paper by Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. This particular testimony is a very brief account of William Beh's experiences during the turbulent times of 1856 and 1857. It includes information about his claim on the south fork of Pottawatomie Creek and his involvement in the militia as a member of Capt. Samuel Anderson's company. He also requests aid, because he has been sick for three or four months.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday, the founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. He told her of his planned trip up the Kansas River, his pleasure in the people of Kansas Territory, and a Thanksgiving dinner he attended. Unwilling to return to Pennsylvania, Holliday expressed desire that Mary come to Kansas Territory and described the construction of a friend's sod-covered "mansion," one such as Clarina I. H. Nichols, a lecturer and writer, inhabited.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday, founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. After three weeks at the future site of Topeka, Holliday was glad for city comforts. He mentioned the site's beauty, the prospect of building a house on his farm claim, and his personal success since leaving Meadville. On December 18, 1854, he had been unanimously elected President of the Topeka Town Association and appointed temporary agent of the New England Emigrant Aid Company. The bottom two-thirds of page 3 and 4 (which contained Holliday's signature) have been cut and removed.

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