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Page 1 of 1, showing 9 records out of 9 total, starting on record 1, ending on 9

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Edmund Burke Whitman to Franklin B. Sanborn

Whitman, E. B. (Edmund Burke), 1812-1883

After returning to Lawrence from a trip east, Whitman wrote Franklin B. Sanborn a mostly personal letter regarding the preparations for the winter and need to extend the loan owed to Sanborn--he had crops enough for subsistence but little cash. Near the end, Whitman commented briefly on the political situation, which was "quiet" at present, but "the difficulties in Linn & Bourbon Counties are renewed" and "J. B. is on the ground and engaged in 'Regulating.'"

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Lewis Taylor Hussey

This black and white photograph shows Lewis Taylor Hussey, (1866-1954). Hussey, a native of Ohio, came to Kansas at the age of two with his family and settled near the town of Williamsburg, Kansas. He later moved to Lyndon, Kansas, in 1889, where he established his professional career as an insurance adjuster. Actively involved in his community, Hussey organized the Osage Fire Insurance Company and he held a number of political offices from the city clerk of Lyndon to the deputy register of deeds of Osage County. He also served as Lyndon's mayor before making a political bid in 1904 for a seat in the Kansas House of Representatives. Hussey represented the Thirty-Fifth district for one term before his appointment in 1905 as the state's oil inspector. When he stepped down from the position in 1909, he continued to serve the state through a number of key political posts. In 1915, Governor Arthur Capper appointed Hussey to the position of state fire marshal. In 1923 he became the chairman of the Kansas Corporation Commission. Hussey's long and successful career as a public servant came to a close on December 29, 1954, when he passed away at the age of eighty-eight in Topeka, Kansas.

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Twenty-two Club

Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)

This file includes correspondence from Carey J. Wilson, Superintendent of Insurance, and replies from Governor Capper's office regarding the Twenty-Two Club. The Twenty-Two Club was an insurance scheme where customers purchased fake health insurance benefits. This is part of a bigger collection of Governor Arthur Capper correspondence.

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Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence, insurance

Kansas. Governor (1929-1931 : Reed)

This file includes subject correspondence relating to insurance. This file is part of a bigger collection of Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence.

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Insurance Commissioner Selection

Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)

This file includes a resolution into the investigation to the insurance lobby in Topeka, Kansas. This is part of a bigger collection of Governor Arthur Capper correspondence.

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Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence, insurance rates

Kansas. Governor (1929-1931 : Reed)

This file includes subject correspondence relating to reduced insurance rates in Kansas. This file is part of a bigger collection of Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence.

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Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence, Blue Sky Department applications

Kansas. Governor (1929-1931 : Reed)

This file includes subject correspondence relating to applications of employment at the Blue Sky Department. The Blue Sky Department was formed during the Progressive Movement to regulate businesses and prevent monopolies of industries in the State of Kansas. This file is part of a bigger collection of Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence.

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Regulation of Insurance Companies Investments Opposed

Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)

This letter from Charles H. Kirshner of Kansas City, Missouri addresses a proposed bill requiring insurance companies to invest portions of their reserve for policies written in that state. Kirshner finds this bill to be unfair to Kansas. Because more policies are written in other states than Kansas; Kansas will receive less money. Insurance companies will need to send more of their investments to states where more policies have been written. This is part of a bigger collection of Governor Arthur Capper correspondence.

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Insurance Business Not State Business

Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)

This correspondence between H.H. Hackney and Governor Capper discusses a bill where Kansas would become part of the Insurance business. Both writers agree that the State should not become part of Insurance business; but the business needs regulation. This is part of a bigger collection of Governor Arthur Capper correspondence.

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