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Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 23 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

A.S. Wilson to Henry J. Allen

Kansas. Governor (1919-1923 : Allen)

A.S. Wilson, an attorney in Galena, Kansas, writes to Governor Henry J. Allen to indicate his interest in a law that would allow second class cities to separate the schools based on "white and colored children." He included a petition with signatures with the letter.

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Bird's Eye View of Concordia, Cloud County, Kansas

Stoner, J. J.

This lithograph is a bird's eye view of Concordia, Cloud County, Kansas. The legend at the bottom identifies the following: Concordia College, the high school, the Courthouse, several churches including a Swedish Baptist Church, hotels, a livery stable, a feed stable, the U. S. Land Office, two commercial land offices, two law offices, and the Concordia Mill. Street names are given. A railroad is shown but the company is not identified. The lithograph was published by J. J. Stoner of Madison, Wisconsin.

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Mary McNerny, Dick Vermail and Dan Lykins

Lykins, Judy

A photograph showing Mary McNerny Lykins, Dick Vermeil, Kansas City Chiefs' coach, and Dan Lykins, Topeka attorney, at St. Benedict's commencement in Atchison, Kansas. Mary McNerny Lykins received her bachelors degree at age 85 and Dick Vermeil was the commencement speaker.

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Washburn Law School, Topeka, Kansas

This black and white photograph shows the Washburn Law School in Topeka, Kansas. The school opened its doors on September 17, 1903 at 118 West Eight Street. In 1911, the school moved to 725-27 Kansas Avenue to accommodate increasing enrollment. Within two years the institution was moving once again after Washburn trustees agreed to purchase the Bell Telephone building at 211 West Sixth Avenue. This location was intended to be the permanent home for the law school but due to renovation problems, the school moved to the Washburn Campus, in 1918, and into the basement of Crane Observatory until future accommodations could be made. A bicycle is visible outside of the building.

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Edward Ray Sloan receiving a honorary doctorate of law at Washburn University

Wolfe's Camera and Photo Shop

This is a photograph of Edward R. Sloan receiving a honorary doctorate of law at Washburn University. Dean Sellen is adjusting the hood and Dr. Stauffer, President of Washburn University is presenting the certificate. Sloan was born in 1883 in Seward County Nebraska. His family came to Kansas in 1886 locating in Sheridan County. Sloan graduated from Campbell College School of Law at Holton in 1904 and Washburn College Law School in 1905. He was elected county attorney of Sheridan County in the fall of 1904 and was re-elected twice while maintaining a private practice in Hoxie, Kansas. In July 1911, Sloan established with Guy L. Hursh the Holton law firm of Hursh & Sloan. In April 1912, Sloan was appointed Holton's city attorney, a position he held for 19 years. In 1930, Sloan helped establish the Topeka firm of Sloan, Hamilton and Sloan, which included his younger brother Floyd and W. Glenn Hamilton. It was the predecessor of the firm Sloan, Listrom, Eisenbarth, Sloan & Glassman. He served three terms in the Kansas House of Representatives from 1923 to 1929. In March 1931, he was appointed by Governor Woodring to fill a vacancy on the Kansas Supreme Court. Judge Sloan served the remaining 21 months of the term but opted not to seek election for another term. Later, he was appointed to the Kansas Corporation Commission and served as chairman from 1936 to 1938. In 1947, he was appointed Referee in Bankruptcy for the District of Kansas, where he served for 14 years. He was a lecturer at Washburn University Law School and compiled a textbook on bankruptcy.

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Elisha J. Scott

Elisha J. Scott, 1890-1963, was raised in Topeka's Tennesseetown. As a youth, he possessed a strong drive and a quick wit, which attracted the eye of prominent Topeka minister Charles M. Sheldon. With financial support from Sheldon and his own abilities to succeed, Scott earned his law degree from Washburn College in 1916. During his long career as an attorney, he argued many civil rights and school segregation cases throughout Kansas and the Midwest. Two of Scott's sons, John and Charles, joined him in his law firm of Scott, Scott, Scott, and Jackson. Together they helped to prosecute, at the local level, the landmark civil rights case of Brown v. Topeka Board of Education.

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Glee S. Smith, Jr.

This is a photograph of Glee S. Smith, Jr. who lived and practiced law in Larned, Kansas, and later Lawrence, Kansas. He was born in Rozel, Kansas, on April 29, 1921. Smith obtained his bachelors and law degrees from the University of Kansas and was a member of Delta Tau Delta fraternity. He served as a First Lieutenant in the Army Air Corps during World War II. Smith served twelve years on the Larned Board of Education and four years as county attorney. He also served as a member on many philanthropic and business corporate boards, including two life insurance companies and bank boards in other cities. He served 16 years in the Kansas State Senate with eight years as President of the Senate. Later, he served on the Kansas Board of Regents. In 1975, he was appointed by President Ford to the Board of the National Legal Services Corporation. Smith served ten years as a member of the Board of Governors of the Kansas Bar Association and ten years as one of three Kansas delegates to the House of Delegates of the American Bar Association.

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Elden Auker and Dan Lykins

Lykins, Judy

This is a photograph of Elden Auker and Dan Lykins at a Kansas State University function. Auker, from Norcatur, Kansas, was an outstanding athlete at Kansas State University lettering nine times. After leaving college, he played baseball with the Detroit Tigers, Boston Red Sox and St. Louis Browns. While with Detroit, Auker went to two consecutive World Series in 1934 and 1935. Dan Lykins, is a Topeka attorney and a member of the Kansas Board of Regents.

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Robert Francis Kennedy speaking at Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas

Lykins, Dan

This is a photograph showing Robert Francis Kennedy speaking at a Landon Lecture Series, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas.

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Chauncey Shaffer to Joseph Denison, 1857

Shaffer, Chauncey

This letter from Chauncey Shaffer, a New York attorney, to Joseph Denison, an agent for Bluemont College, is one example of many letters received by Denison and Isaac Goodnow that pledged monetary support for the creation of the college in Manhattan, Kansas Territory. In this case, Shaffer stated that he would do his best to raise $5000, but cautioned against expecting too much, as tough financial times were upon them.

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