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Page 1 of 1, showing 4 records out of 4 total, starting on record 1, ending on 4

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Josiah Miller

Although born in South Carolina, Josiah Miller was a free state supporter. He attended college in Indiana and law school in New York. He came to Kansas in 1854 and on January 5, 1855, established the Kansas Free State newspaper in Lawrence. The newspaper office was destroyed by order of the territorial government on May 21, 1856 because is was deemed a nuisance. He was capturned by Buford's proslavery forces and was tried for treason against the state of South Carolina. He supported John C. Fremont. In 1857, he was elected probate judge of Douglas County, Kansas Territory.

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William Hutchinson

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A portrait of William Hutchinson, a journalist and correspondent for the New York Times, Chicago Tribune, St. Louis Democrat and Washington Republic, he covered events in Kansas from 1855 through the early 1860s. He settled in Lawrence, Kansas Territory. Hutchinson served as secretary of the Kansas Central Committee and assisted with efforts to send emigrant parties and relief to Kansas Territory. He was first identified with the abolition or free-soil party, until the Republican party organized. Hutchinson was a member of the Wyandotte Constitution Convention and was an early and persistent advocate of temperance and other reforms.

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Horace Greeley

A photograph of Horace Greeley who was editor of the New York Tribune during the Kansas territorial era. He actively supported the free state cause in Kansas through editorials as well as coming to Kansas in 1859. He advocated resistance to the implementation of the Kansas-Nebraska Act and was involved in the founding of the Republican Party.

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Lilla Day Monroe

Lilla Day Monroe, 1858-1929, was a Kansas journalist who established and edited "The Club Woman" and "The Kansas Woman's Journal." As editor of "The Kansas Woman's Journal," Monroe solicited reminiscences of pioneer life from Kansas women, receiving hundreds of responses. She organized these reminiscences into a collection, and published many of them in the journal. She was also an active supporter of women's suffrage, being a member of the Kansas State Suffrage Association and serving as its president for several years.

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