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Page 1 of 1, showing 8 records out of 8 total, starting on record 1, ending on 8

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Eula Gentzler papers

Gentzler, Eula (Eula A.), 1910-1992

This collection consists of letters written by Eula Gentzler to her parents in Topeka, Kansas, and official military correspondence as a U.S. Army nurse. Miss Gentzler referred to hospital ship activities, places she visited, and family references. Occasionally Eula expressed her thoughts on the war. Eula A. Gentzler was born November 10, 1910, in Belleville, Kansas. Her father Ernest T. Gentzler was a fireman for the Union Pacific Railroad. The family moved to Topeka when Eula was, approximately, thirteen years old. She graduated from Topeka High School and, later, the Asbury Hospital School of Nursing in Salina, Kansas, in 1937. She enlisted in the U. S. Army Nurse Corps in October, 1942. She was discharged in Octorber, 1945, but was recalled during the Korean conflict serving from 1951 to 1957. Miss Gentzler was sent to Europe in the fall of 1943. She was assigned to duty on the hospital ships Shamrock and Arcadia, working in surgery as well as the wards. Both carried approximately 800 patients. The ships carried injured servicemen from North Africa and Europe to the U. S., requiring six weeks to make a trip across, pick up a load of patients, and return. When in the war zone, they would get patients during battles and would then work extended shifts. Miss Gentzler recalled that during the battle at Enzio, they started surgery at 1 p.m. and operated until 5 a.m. the next morning. On another occasion, they picked up a load of British sailors whose mine sweeper had been bombed and the hospital crew worked all night until they ran out of supplies. Eula Gentzler died on April 13, 1992.

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Make nursing your war job

World War II era poster showing a photo of a nurse and a drawing of patients. The poster portrays nursing as a promising profession for women, especially during wartime.

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United States Army nurses during World War II

A photo of United States Army nurses at an evacuation hospital between Capua and Venafro, Italy. The photograph was taken during World War II. The nurse on the far right is Lt. Ruth Lee from White City, Kansas.

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Graves Drug Store, Garnett, Kansas

Interior view of Graves Drug Store. Shown is the soda fountain, employees, and a customer.

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Beatrice Coats interview, WWII oral history, Kinsley, Kansas

Coats, Beatrice Josephine (Basgall)

This is an interview with Beatrice Coats, part of an oral history project entitled "Patchwork of Dependency: The Effects of WWII on Edwards County, Kansas" conducted by the Kinsley Public Library. The project was supported by a Kansas Humanities Council Heritage Grant. Beatrice talks of her family, education, and the home front during WWII.

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Sally Frame interview, Kinsley, Kansas

Frame, Sally Josena (Wilson)

This transcript of an interview with Sally Frame is part of an oral history project entitled "Patterns of Change, Edwards County, Kansas 1950-1970" conducted by the Kinsley Public Library. The project was supported by a Kansas Humanities Council Heritage Grant. Frame talks of her family, education, and her memories of the Edwards County community.

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Elizabeth Degenhardt Pack

Portrait of Elizabeth Degenhardt Pack of Wabaunsee County, Kansas, in a nursing uniform. She attended Baylor University School of Nurses in the early 1940s.

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VOX-KOP: the voice of the Kansas Ordnance Plant

Kansas Ordnance Plant (Parsons, Kan.)

This employee newsletter was published at the Kansas Ordnance Plant in Parsons, Labette County, Kansas, during World War II, until it was halted because of the paper shortage. It contains news about the employees, their families, and soldiers from the area, and includes many pictures. The Kansas Historical Society has issues beginning with volume 1, no. 22, September 21, 1942 through July 30, 1943. Issues published in 1943 are available as Kansas Memory unit 444027.

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