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Page 1 of 5, showing 10 records out of 41 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Henry and Mary Worrall playing guitars

Guitarist and artist Henry Worrall of Topeka, Kansas, plays music with his wife, Mary Elizabeth Harvey Worrall. Henry and Mary frequently performed together in Cincinnati, Ohio, before moving to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868. Worrall's celebrated solo guitar instrumentals "Sebastopol" and "Spanish Fandango" enjoyed great popularity in the nineteenth century. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular solo guitar pieces played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Henry Worrall died in Topeka in 1902. Mary Worrall died in Topeka in 1915.

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Thurlow Lieurance and Chief Veu Tura

This is a photograph showing Thurlow Lieurance with Chief Veu Tura, Sun Priest of the Taos Pueblo Indians. Lieurance was an American composer who was greatly influenced by Native American music. He is best know for his song "By the Water of Minnetonka".

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Thurlow Lieurance and Antonio La Hau

This is a photograph of Thurlow Lieurance, renown composer, and Antonio La Hau. Lieurance's musical career began as a bandsman with the 22nd Kansas Volunteer Regiment during the Spanish American War. Later he studied at the Cincinnati College of Music. Lieurance became fascinated with Native American music and instruments and that fascination led to innumerable compositions, including his best known piece, "By the Waters of Minnetonka," first recorded in 1914. From 1926 to 1945 he was Dean of Fine Arts at Wichita University (now Wichita State University) and took that school's music program to national prominence.

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Chimes of E

Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902

This document is Henry Worrall's original manuscript copy of a solo guitar instrumental he called "Chimes of E." This piece is presumed to be an original composition or arrangement by Worrall. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.

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Henry Worrall with a plant grown in the great Arkansas Valley

Leonard & Martin

A photograph of Henry Worrall with a plant specimen grown in the Great Arkansas Valley. Besides being a musician and illustrator, Worrall was involved in promoting the agricultural potential of Kansas.

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Spanish Fandango

Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902

Guitarist Henry Worrall published his arrangement of the celebrated solo guitar instrumental "Spanish Fandango" about 1866 with J.L. Peters & Bros., music publisher, of St. Louis, Missouri. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.

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Dan Kelley

This black and white photograph, taken in Providence, Rhode Island, shows composer Dan Kelley of the song "Home on the Range." Kelley a carpenter by trade was also a musician and composer for the Harlan Brothers orchestra. His musical talents and the beautiful verses from the poem "My Western Home" by Dr. Brewster Highley, set to music one of the most popular songs ever written. On June 30, 1947, "Home on the Range" was officially recognized as the state song of Kansas.

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Untitled and Jack

Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902

This document is Henry Worrall's original manuscript music for two solo guitar instrumentals, one untitled and one titled "Jack." In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.

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Ernest "Ernie" Douglas collection

Douglas, Ernie

This collection contains photographs of Topeka musician Ernie (Ernest) Douglas, his band, and his restaurant and jazz club, Ernie's Catfish Hollow. Douglas was born November 30, 1932, in Topeka. During the 1950s, Douglas worked as a radio DJ and musician, playing the piano and vibraphone. After a time in Denver, Douglas returned to Topeka where he opened Ernie's Catfish Hollow in 1978 at 1201 E. 6th Street. The restaurant and jazz club closed in 1983. Later Douglas worked for the Postal Service in St. Louis, Missouri, and as a performer on the Dandy Dinner Boat in Alexandria, Virginia. Douglas died in Ellicott City, Maryland on February 15, 2016.

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Medley of airs

Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902

Several instrumental pieces by Henry Worrall are included here within a series of solo guitar pieces published by J.L. Peters & Bro. of St. Louis, Missouri. This copy of that collection includes only Worrall's "Medley of Airs" and is from his personal music collection. The medley includes the following songs: "Whal be King but Charlie," "Spanish Dance," "Gliding Jessy," "Fisher's Hornpipe," "Celebrated Spanish Serenade," and "Smith's West End Serenade." The title page includes the inscription "From Mama [Mary E. Harvey Worrall], March 9th, 1903, 715 Polk St, Topeka." In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.

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