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Page 1 of 11, showing 10 records out of 109 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Murdock Band, Murdock, Kansas

An informal view of the members of the Murdock Band of Murdock, Kansas.

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Mount Hope Band, Mount Hope, Kansas

A formal view of the members of the Mount Hope Band in Mount Hope, Kansas.

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Henry and Mary Worrall playing guitars

Guitarist and artist Henry Worrall of Topeka, Kansas, plays music with his wife, Mary Elizabeth Harvey Worrall. Henry and Mary frequently performed together in Cincinnati, Ohio, before moving to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868. Worrall's celebrated solo guitar instrumentals "Sebastopol" and "Spanish Fandango" enjoyed great popularity in the nineteenth century. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular solo guitar pieces played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Henry Worrall died in Topeka in 1902. Mary Worrall died in Topeka in 1915.

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Paul Robeson in concert, Topeka Municipal Auditorium

This program describes a concert by Paul Robeson at the municipal auditorium in Topeka, Kansas. Robeson was assisted by pianists William Schatzkamer and Lawrence Brown. Robeson was a well-known civil rights activist and musician who was blacklisted during the McCarthy era. He sang primarily classical music but closed the program with Negro folk songs.

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Women's band, Udall, Kansas

Baugh, John

This black and white photograph shows the women's band from Udall, Kansas. The members have been identified from left to right: Mr. Kelsey; band leader, Blanch Rutter Allen, Flora Miller Brewer, Blanch Hammond Johnson, Hazel Kiser Dale, Ella Hoop Gray, Marie Beebe Effner, Effie Greenland, Agnes Miller, Edna Carlton Davidson, Elinor Beebe, Lucille Greenland Kuhn.

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Women's band, Udall, Kansas

Baugh, John

This black and white photograph shows the women's band from Udall, Kansas. The members have been identified as the following: FRONT ROW: Lucille Greenland; snare drum, Marie Beebe; clarinet, Elinor Beebe; tuba, Mr. Kelsey; band leader, Agnes Miller; trombone, Ella Hoop; clarinet, Absent; Pearl and Gladys Dunlap. BACK ROW: Blanche Hammon; cornet, Flora Miller; bass drum, Blanch Rutter; cornet, Hazel Kiser; melephone, Effie Greenland; melephone and Edna Carlton; baritone.

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Thurlow Lieurance and Chief Veu Tura

This is a photograph showing Thurlow Lieurance with Chief Veu Tura, Sun Priest of the Taos Pueblo Indians. Lieurance was an American composer who was greatly influenced by Native American music. He is best know for his song "By the Water of Minnetonka".

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Thurlow Lieurance and Antonio La Hau

This is a photograph of Thurlow Lieurance, renown composer, and Antonio La Hau. Lieurance's musical career began as a bandsman with the 22nd Kansas Volunteer Regiment during the Spanish American War. Later he studied at the Cincinnati College of Music. Lieurance became fascinated with Native American music and instruments and that fascination led to innumerable compositions, including his best known piece, "By the Waters of Minnetonka," first recorded in 1914. From 1926 to 1945 he was Dean of Fine Arts at Wichita University (now Wichita State University) and took that school's music program to national prominence.

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Chimes of E

Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902

This document is Henry Worrall's original manuscript copy of a solo guitar instrumental he called "Chimes of E." This piece is presumed to be an original composition or arrangement by Worrall. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.

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Oakley Band, Oakley, Kansas

The members of the Oakley Band of Oakley, Kansas, are standing in a rough circle on an unpaved street. Also visible are utility poles and power cables, and businesses and buildings on both sides of the street.

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