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Page 1 of 1, showing 6 records out of 6 total, starting on record 1, ending on 6

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Paul Robeson in concert, Topeka Municipal Auditorium

This program describes a concert by Paul Robeson at the municipal auditorium in Topeka, Kansas. Robeson was assisted by pianists William Schatzkamer and Lawrence Brown. Robeson was a well-known civil rights activist and musician who was blacklisted during the McCarthy era. He sang primarily classical music but closed the program with Negro folk songs.

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Band, Kansas City, Kansas

A view of a band performing in Kansas City as part of the Work Progress Administration's Federal Music Project. Also visible is a large stone building immediately behind the band.

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State Insane Asylum Band, Topeka, Kansas

This sepia colored photograph shows members of the State Insane Asylum Band in Topeka, Kansas. The members have been identified by their last name and the instrument they played. The back row: Calkins, first tenor trombone; Baker, second tenor trombone; Randall, baritone; Brooks, cornet; Litsinger, tuba; Blume, tuba. Second row: Perine, piccolo; Hull,clarinet; Canterburg, clarinet; Sample, second alto trombone; Mymore, first alto trombone; Calkins, solo alto trombone. First row: Bumm, snare drum; Walrad, bass drum.

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Forest Savage

This black and white photograph shows Forest Savage, (1826-1915), copied from the book "A History of Lawrence, Kansas: From the First Settlement to the Close of the Rebellion" by Richard Cordley. Savage, a musician and member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company, migrated, on August 29, 1854, to Lawrence, Kansas with brother John. After their arrival to the Kansas Territory on September 11, 1854, the men founded the first musical band in Kansas. The newly formed band grew in membership and became instrumental in entertaining settlers and troops in the days leading up to the start of the Civil War. In October of 1864, during Price's Raid, the band went into battle and served as a militia band for nearly two weeks before returning home. Their military career's were short lived but their musical careers would live on. In 1867, the musicians would play for the first commencement at the University of Kansas. On September 15, 1879, the remaining members of the band, including Forest Savage, gathered one last time to performed for the twenty-fifth anniversary of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's arrival to Lawrence, Kansas. Forest Savage lived his remaining years in the town he migrated to as a young man. On August 17, 1915 at the age of eighty-nine, he passed away quietly in his home. Burial was conducted in Oak Hill Cemetery in Lawrence, Kansas.

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Senator Arthur Capper and Charles "Buddy" Rogers

An informal portrait of Kansas Senator Arthur Capper, 1865-1951, a native of Garnett, Kansas, and actor Charles "Buddy" Rogers, 1904-1999, a native of Olathe, Kansas, at the White House in Washington, D.C. Capper, 1865-1951, served Kansas as Governor, 1915-1919, and U. S. Senator, 1919-1949.

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John Christoph photograph album

This album contains photographs of Ellinwood and Barton County, Kansas, taken by John Christoph. On June 18, 1891, he opened a photography gallery in the north room of a furniture store and continued in the business until February 14, 1919. Christoph also served as the Ellinwood police judge for twenty years.

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