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Page 1 of 5, showing 10 records out of 45 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Albert Turner Reid

A photograph showing Albert Turner Reid drawing in his studio. Reid was a successful businessman, a staunch supporter of the American farmer, a composer, a painter of murals and a teacher of art. The art school which he started with George Stone in Topeka was the beginning of Washburn University's Art Department. Although a talented artist and successful newspaper publisher, Albert T. Reid is probably best remembered for his political cartoons. Reid sold his first cartoon to the Topeka Mail & Breeze in 1896. For the next 30 years, his cartoons appeared regularly in Kansas City, Chicago, and New York newspapers and several national magazines. They remain today a major contribution to the history of American politics. A large collection of his work is in the collections of the Kansas Historical Society.

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Frederic Remington

Frederic Remington took art classes as a freshman at Yale. He decided he was less interested in still life and more fascinated with action drawings. At the age of nineteen he decided to head west in search of frontier adventure and fortune. Remington lived in Kansas from 1883 to 1885. He first invested in a sheep ranch near Peabody. He continued his sketching, but soon found he disliked ranch life. Remington sold his interest in the ranch and returned east to acquire more money. He returned to Kansas City and bought a hardware store, also becoming a silent partner in a saloon. In 1884 he married Eva Caten. Unhappy with Remington's cartoons at the time and his involvement in the saloon, she returned to New York. Alone amid failing businesses, Remington was motivated to rely on his sketches for income. Virtually a self-taught artist, Remington was soon receiving national acclaim for his paintings and illustrations. In 1886 Remington's work was reproduced on a full page in Harper's Weekly. During the early 1890s Remington illustrated books and articles by such famous authors as Theodore Roosevelt and Francis Parkman. By 1895 Remington had begun sculpting the bronzes of cowboys and American Indians for which he is now legendary. He died at the age of 48 in 1909.

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Frederic Remington

A photograph of Frederic Remington working in his studio. He took art classes as a freshman at Yale, and he decided he was less interested in still life and more fascinated with action drawings. At the age of nineteen he decided to head west in search of frontier adventure and fortune. Remington lived in Kansas from 1883 to 1885. He first invested in a sheep ranch near Peabody. He continued his sketching, but soon found he disliked ranch life. Remington sold his interest in the ranch and returned east to acquire more money. He returned to Kansas City and bought a hardware store, also becoming a silent partner in a saloon. In 1884, he married Eva Caten. She became unhappy with Remington's cartoons and his involvement in the saloon so she left and returned to New York. Alone amid a failing business, Remington was motivated to rely on his sketches for income. Virtually a self-taught artist, Remington was soon receiving national acclaim for his paintings and illustrations. In 1886 Remington's work was reproduced on a full page in Harper's Weekly. During the early 1890s Remington illustrated books and articles by such famous authors as Theodore Roosevelt and Francis Parkman. By 1895 Remington had begun sculpting the bronzes of cowboys and American Indians for which he is now legendary. He died at the age of 48 in 1909.

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Samuel J. Reader

Reader, Samuel James, 1836-1914

This is a cabinet card showing Samuel J. Reader (1836-1914), who was born in Pennsylvania. He began a diary at the age of 13 and continued it until his death in 1914 at the age of 78. The diary--and the autobiography he wrote from it--describes his move to Kansas Territory in 1855, his claim near Topeka, his military experiences, farming, and his later service as Soldier Township trustee and school district clerk. He liberally illustrated his diary and recorded these events on canvas. His best known works are his drawings and paintings of territorial and Civil War experiences including the Battle of the Blue, which he is working on in this photograph. Although rather naïve in style, Reader's illustrations provide a valuable record of early Kansas history, its social and political events.

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Avis Chitwood

The Elite

This is a portrait of Avis Chitwood as a child. Avis was born in Mound City, December 29, 1893, and died in Topeka, January 25, 1994, at the age of 100. She is buried in Mount Hope Cemetery, Topeka. She was a teacher, painter, illustrator, printmaker, and etcher. She specialized in rustic buildings, wildflowers, and missions.

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Avis Chitwood and Janice Gartrell

A photograph of Avis Chitwood and her niece Janice Gartrell. Avis was born in Mound City, December 29, 1893 and died in Topeka, January 25, 1994 at the age of 100. She is buried at Mount Hope Cemetery, Topeka, Kansas. She was a teacher, painter, illustrator, printmaker, and etcher, specializing in rustic buildings, wildflowers, and missions. Janice, b.1920, d.2009, was the daughter of Milton Paul Gartrell, b.1876, d.1959 and Edna Chitwood Gartrell, Avis Chitwood's sister.

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Hannah Headlee

A photograph showing Pauline Haynes (left), Clif Haynes, and Hannah Headlee (right) taken in Kansas City, Kansas. Born in Topeka, Kansas, about 1867, Hannah Headlee was an artist, quilter, teacher and china painter. "The Iris" one of her quilting masterpieces is in the Kansas State Historical Society's museum.

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George Melville Stone

This is a photograph of George Stone, internationally known artist, working on a painting at his studio in Topeka, Kansas. He studied art in Paris at Académie Julian under Lefebvre, Bonnât, and Boulanger, from 1887 to 1891 and in New York City with Henry Mosler. Stone returned to Topeka with a number of paintings reflecting his classical training and Impressionist influences. He opened an art school with cartoonist-publisher Albert T. Reid, which later became Washburn University's art department. Stone's paintings of Kansas landscapes and farmers earned him the title of "The Millet of the Prairies," since his style was thought to be very similar to that of the French artist Jean-François Millet.

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George Melville Stone working in his studio

This is a photograph of George Melville Stone working on a portrait in his studio. The photograph was copied from an unidentified book or magazine.

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Menninger East Campus Canteen in Topeka, Kansas

This is an interior view of the Arts and Craft Shop at Menninger Clinic which was later converted to the Canteen on East Campus. The mural shows the various craft activities carried on at the Menninger Clinic. It was painted by Mr. John Ballator, art instructor at Washburn College and husband of the Menninger occupational therapist. The woman sitting with a scarf across her lap represents Mrs. Ballator. The nurse is Miss Erickson and Mr. Stone is to the left of the nurse. In the background, the three Doctors Menninger (Dr. C.F., Dr. Karl and Dr. Will) are planting a tree. Beyond them is the farmhouse which was the first sanitarium and became offices of the Menninger Clinic. The mural was hung in 1940.

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