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Page 1 of 1, showing 9 records out of 9 total, starting on record 1, ending on 9

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Henry Worrall watercolor

Worrall, Henry

This promotional watercolor of Kansas scenes was painted by artist Henry Worrall for the Woman?s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU). It is believed that Worrall painted the poster for the Kansas chapter of the WCTU to use at the World's Industrial and Cotton Centennial Exposition held in New Orleans in 1884. The poster depicts Topeka and various types of Kansas iconography.

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Samuel J. Reader

Samuel J. Reader lived in Shawnee County, Kansas Territory, and participated in some free state activities. He wrote about his daily life (including descriptions of the Battles of Indianola and Hickory Point) in his diary, which he used as the basis for an autobiography he illustrated with drawings and watercolor paintings. This photograph is a copy that Reader made from a daguerreotype taken of him in 1855 at age eighteen. The copy was produced on March 1, 1894, in La Harpe, Hancock County, Illinois.

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John Brown portrait

Ruggles, Quartus E.

Oil portrait of John Brown, painted in 1882 by Quartus Ruggles. The famed abolitionist joined his sons in Kansas in 1855 and engaged in often violent activity directed at proslavery supporters. This portrait depicts Brown as he would have appeared after the Battle of Osawatomie, where free-state and proslavery bands clashed in 1856. The artist, Quartus Ruggles, never met Brown himself but painted this portrait over 20 years after the man?s death. It was displayed in the Society?s portrait gallery for many years.

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Walker Winslow correspondence

Winslow, Walker, 1905-1969

This handwritten and typed correspondence is between Walker Winslow (also under the name Harold Maine) and his third wife, Edna Manley Winslow. The letters can be chatty and newsy, providing details about each of their daily lives and activities, what they were reading or music to which they were listening, their work (his writing and therapy, her writing and painting), and other related topics. The letters can be very self-reflective and analytical regarding their relationship to each other, relationships with others, their health and various injuries and illnesses they each had, money, their mutual loneliness, Edna's drinking, and other topics. There is also correspondence with friends and relatives of Winslow and/or Edna, Winslow family photographs, some sketches Edna drew, and extensive correspondence between Winslow and Dr. Karl Menninger. Walker Winslow was the author of "The Menninger Story" and "If A Man Be Mad." Some of the letters were written while Winslow was working at and writing in Topeka, Kansas. They were also written while the Winslows lived separately in Santa Fe, New Mexico; various parts of California (especially Big Sur or Oakland); various parts of New York (especially Rochester and New York City); and in Kansas. The letters document the rise and fall of their brief and intense relationship. Given the nature of some of the content, several pieces of correspondence have not been made available on Kansas Memory, but they are still available to researchers.

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Mary Bartlett Pillsbury Weston

Mettner's Studio, Lawrence, Kansas

This cabinet card shows Mary Bartlett Pillsbury Weston, (1817-1894), a professional and accomplished artist from New Hampshire who moved in 1874 to reside in Lawrence, Kansas. She captured the essence of Kansas and its "promising future" in an oil painting entitled "The Spirit of Kansas". The painting was created for the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago, Illinois, and it carried the message of how culture and civilization brought peace and progress to the state.

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Henry Worrall

A photograph of musician and illustrator Henry Worrall apparently taken in Atlanta in 1881.

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Henry Worrall

Landy, J. (James)

This is a cabinet card photograph of musician and illustrator Henry Worrall of Topeka, Kansas. Presumably, Worrall sat for this photo in the studio of James Landy in Cincinnati, Ohio, where Worrall formerly lived. The photo was likely taken in the 1870s sometime after 1873. The back of the photograph is inscribed by Landy as follows: "Compliments of your friend J Landy."

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Las Animas

Tavernier, Jules

Brown wash sketch titled "Las Animas" by Jules Tavernier. Tavernier was born in Paris in 1844 and trained as an artist in France. He served as a soldier in the Franco-Prussian War, and his drawings of war-torn Paris were flown by hot air balloon to London for publication. After the war he worked as an illustrator in London and then in New York for Harper's Weekly. In 1872, Harper's sent him on a trip across the United States on an assignment to document the American West. He arrived in San Francisco in 1874. This sketch is most likely a scene that Tavernier saw while in Colorado on that trip. Tavernier went on to be a well-known artist in California before moving to Hawaii, where he was part of a group of artists known as the Volcano School. He died in Honolulu in 1889.

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Henry and Mary Worrall

A cabinet card portrait of Henry and Mary Worrall in Cincinnati, Ohio, possibly in 1886. The inscription on the back of the card indicates that it was "taken by Webber."

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