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Page 1 of 1, showing 7 records out of 7 total, starting on record 1, ending on 7

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Eagle wheat weaving

Banbury, Joyce

Wheat weaving artist Joyce Banbury presented this eagle to Governor John Carlin in Topeka on August 18, 1986. The weaving was given on behalf of the Kansas Wheat Commission (KWC) to recognize Governor Carlin?s support for wheat producers. Joyce Banbury, of Russell, Kansas, was commissioned by KWC to complete the weaving. She was a skilled artist who wrote books on wheat weaving and was frequently featured in craft magazines. Banbury and her son specialized in growing vintage wheat breeds with long stems suitable for weaving. The eagle took two days to weave and it is made from a vintage hard winter wheat grown by Banbury on her Russell farm.

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Wolf Creek Nuclear Generating Station logo

Bosin, Blackbear

Wolf Creek Nuclear Generating Station corporate insignia designed by artist Blackbear Bosin. Completed in 1985 after years of debate over nuclear power, the Wolf Creek Generating Station is located near Burlington, Kansas. Plant owner?s commissioned American-Indian artist Blackbear Bosin to design this corporate insignia. In the mythological design, he included the wolf, a great provider, and the Sirius Star, a symbol of heat, to promote the positive aspects of the plant. Bosin was born of Kiowa and Comanche heritage in Oklahoma. He served in the Marines during WWII and worked as an illustrator in Wichita. This poster, signed by Bosin, was given to Governor John Carlin for his support of the Wolf Creek Station.

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Stephen Douglas portrait

Louis O. Lussier

Portrait of Stephen Douglas by Louis Lussier. Douglas helped write the Kansas-Nebraska Act, which called for the repeal of the Missouri Compromise of 1820. Kansas and Nebraska were opened up for settlement but the people living there, not the national government, would determine whether these states would be free or slave. Douglas had been a member of Congress and a United States Senator from Illinois from 1847 until his death in 1861. He was the Democratic Party nominees for President in 1860 and ran, unsuccessfully, against Abraham Lincoln. He had defeated Lincoln two years earlier when both were running for U.S. Senator from Illinois and when they had their famous Lincoln-Douglas debates.

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Andrew H. Reeder portrait

Hall, Cyrenius

Portrait of Andrew Horatio Reeder, 1807-1864, who was the first governor of Kansas Territory. In 1855, Reeder was removed from office by President Pierce and forced to leave Kansas when threatened with arrest for a charge of high treason issued by a pro-slavery grand jury. He escaped with the help of Thomas and Julia Stinson, who dressed him in women's clothing. In May 1856, Reeder disguised himself as a woodcutter (as depicted in this painting) and escaped via a steamboat on the Missouri River. Artist Cyrenius Hall painted this portrait in 1880.

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Samuel Newitt Wood

Leonard & Martin

Samuel Newitt Wood was an active participant on behalf of the free state cause. He served in the Kansas Territory legislature and was a delegate to the Leavenworth Constitutional Convention. He was also involved in some of the armed conflicts during the territorial era. He settled in Chase County, Kansas.

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Samuel Reader self-portrait

Reader, Samuel J.

Self-portrait by Samuel Reader, an early settler and chronicler of territorial life in Kansas. This watercolor was executed in 1908, but based on an early daguerreotype photograph. Reader was an avid diarist who drew in his diaries and, later, his autobiography. During his lifetime, Samuel Reader was best known for his drawings and paintings of the Battle of the Big Blue and other Civil War experiences in Kansas.

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Rose Cecil O' Neill

F. De Maria & Co. N.Y.

This postcard shows suffragist Rose Cecil O' Neill, to the left, and her sister Callista O' Neill promoting the Nineteenth Amendment to grant women the right to vote in the Untied States. A professional illustrator and writer by trade, Rose also became the first female cartoonist in the United States. The comic strip consisted of a baby with a round face and body known as "Kewpie." Her illustrations appeared in a number of magazines from Ladies Home Journal to Good Housekeeping. The success from this character also helped Rose to use "Kewpie" as a champion for women's right to vote. She drew posters and cartoons showing the cupid babies wearing suffrage sashes and marching in parades. After the Nineteenth Amendment was ratified on August 18, 1920, Rose continued to use her art to advocated for women's causes.

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