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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 12 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Charles Chadwick to Hiram Hill

Chadwick, Charles

Charles Chadwick wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, concerning several 40 acre lots which were marked off shortly before Samuel N. Simpson left town. It appeared to Chadwick that those Simpson had purchased were purchased on the behalf of absentee investors, such as Hill, even though they had not been divided or designated in the name of any others. Chadwick presumed that Abelard Guthrie would allow Hill to have the land he thought was being purchased in his name upon payment to the Town Company. Chadwick also reported that prices of land were staying up in Quindaro, and that business development continued.

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Albert C. Morton to Hiram Hill

Morton, Albert C.

Albert Morton wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts. Morton predicted a good property market for the coming spring, despite the "hard money matters" which had been the situation during the winter. He reported that the Shawnee lands would open soon, to have them paid for by the end of the summer, and that Hill's land investments in Manhattan were "in good standing". Morton added that Samuel Simpson has been busy lately, traveling back and forth from Quindaro to Lawrence.

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Charles Chadwick to Hiram Hill

Chadwick, Charles

Charles Chadwick wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, regarding economic conditions in town. Chadwick asked that Hill promptly pay his debt to Abelard Guthrie, a fellow Quindaro investor, who was on the brink of bankruptcy. He added that Clinton County, Missouri, had voted not to invest in the Parkville and Grand River Railroad that fall, which had damaged the possibility for a boom in economic activity for the coming fall. Chadwick reported that heavy rains had hindered transportation on local rivers, but was optimistic that October might bring some money to the town through land sales. No news had been heard from Causin, the Washington attorney who was assisting Hill to retain some disputed lands.

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Hiram Hill to Erastus D. Ladd & S.B. Prentiss

Hill, Hiram, 1804-

Hiram Hill wrote to E. D. Ladd and S. B. Prentiss in Kansas Territory, requesting that they send a new drawing of the West Lawrence town shares when they are available, and asking about the prospect of selling town lots there. Hill also inquired about a share of Emporia stock that he had given to Mr. Whitney to pass on to them. He answered their questions regarding maintenance of his rental properties, and confirmed that only "necessary repairs" were to be completed at his expense.

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Erastus D. Ladd to Hiram Hill

Ladd, Erastus D

Erastus Ladd wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill, in Massachusetts. Ladd enclosed with this note a map of Lawrence along with a list of Hill's properties in West Lawrence. He also alluded to a "town site question", which may refer to questionable business practices on the part of Samuel N. Simpson, during the development of Quindaro, Kansas Territory.

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Henry F. Parker to Hiram Hill

Parker, Henry F.

Henry Parker wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts. Parker described the situation in K.T. as "dull. . .every man you se [sic] here Looks blue and no Business and allmost [sic] Every Family are Sick". He told Hill that the Cincinnati House was the only property of his that was occupied, all other of Hill's homes and buildings were vacant; many people were selling their property. Parker closed his letter with a mention of the recent election to ratify the Lecompton Constitution under the English bill.

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Samuel Newell Simpson to Hiram Hill

Simpson, Samuel Newell

Samuel N. Simpson wrote to Hiram Hill from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, updating him on the status of Hill's rents and outlining the rental agreements he had arranged with the various tenants. Simpson mentioned he had raised the $5000 for the church, as promised, and that Hill's money could not be invested in Wyandotte lands until they were properly surveyed. He added that he had recently brought firearms to Kansas Territory, stating " I think our trouble in Kansas has only begun -- but let the war and even dissolution come -- the quicker the better."

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unknown writer to Hiram Hill

The author of this letter, most likely Henry F. Parker, wrote to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, communicating to Hill roughly the amount of property taxes he owed and seeking confirmation of the specific lot numbers Hill owned.

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R.C. Brant to Hiram Hill

Brant, R.C.

R.C. Brant, a Baptist missionary who had settled in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, wrote to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, regarding the use of Hill's land. Brant owned a town lot next to Hill's, and wished to make improvements to his land, which would require that he use Hill's lot. Brant explained that he had many visitors coming and going who would see the beauty of the area and might be inclined to settle in the area if he be allowed to improve his own lot. A note at the end of the letter supports Brant's credibility as a permanent citizen of Lawrence who had already made improvements to the town.

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Albert C. Morton to Hiram Hill

Morton, Albert C.

Albert Morton wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts. Morton had recently returned to Quindaro in order to vote on the Lecompton Constitution as submitted by the English bill. Having arrived there, he found the place to be "dull". Morton described many empty houses and buildings, left behind from settlers selling out to return home; money had also been lost in investments and bridges were washed out in floods. However, the Town Company had invested in a flour mill, which had commenced operations. Morton also discussed matters of buying and selling land warrants with Hill.

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