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Thematic Time Period -- Cattle Drives, 1867 - 1885 (Remove)
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People -- Notable Kansans (Remove)
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Page 1 of 1, showing 5 records out of 5 total, starting on record 1, ending on 5

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Joseph McCoy

At the end of the Civil War when millions of longhorns were left on the plains of Texas without a market, the Union Pacific was building west across Kansas. Joseph McCoy, an Illinois stockman, believed these cattle could be herded north for shipment by rail. He built yards at Abilene and sent agents to notify the Texas cattlemen. In 1867 the first drives were made up the Chisholm Trail and during the next five years more than a million head were received.

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Col. O.W. Wheeler's cattle herd

Baker-Co

View of Col. O. W. Wheeler's herd en route to the Kansas Pacific Railway in 1867. The illustration was copied from "Historic Sketches of the Cattle Trade" by Joseph McCoy published in 1874. The illustrator is Henry Worrall.

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H. Butterfield to Governor John A. Martin

H. Butterfield of Salem, Jewell County, Kansas, writes to Governor John A. Martin in Topeka with a list of questions about the recently amended alcohol prohibition law regulating the sale of alcohol by druggists. Butterifeld asks whether any person can sign a prescription for alcohol, whether a druggist has a right to sell alcohol to someone the druggist knows will get drunk, what can be done when the county offices will not prosecute violations of the law, whether a minor has a right to a permit as a druggist to sell alcohol, and whether a billiard hall saloon that remains open on Sundays can be declared a nuisance and prosecuted under the law. Butterfield concludes by expressing his support for prohibition and asking for better enforcement of the law.

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Dance-House

Baker-Co

An illustration of an exuberant dance at a dance house copied from Joseph G. McCoy's Historic Sketches of the Cattle Trade of the West and Southwest, 1874. The illustrator is Henry Worrall.

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James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok

This formal portrait take in Hays, Kansas shows James Butler " Wild Bill" Hickok. (1837-1876). The legendary lawman and gun-slinger began his career in 1858 as peace officer of the Monticello Township in the Kansas Territory of Johnson County. For a number of years Hickok also worked as a government scout, guide and deputy U.S. marshal across the Great Plains. His reputation as a skilled marksman proceeded him wherever he went. In 1869 Hickok was elected marshal of Hays, Kansas and sheriff of Ellis County, Kansas. A role he served until 1870. In 1871, he was hired as Abilene, Kansas' town marshal. As marshal he earned fame for being a quick draw and for spending most of his time playing cards. Hickok was killed on August 01, 1876 while playing a game of poker at a saloon in the Deadwood, Dakota Territory.

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