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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 16 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Mary Dillon Holliday to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

Holliday, Mary Dillon, 1833-1908

Mary Holliday wrote from Meadville, Pennsylvania to her husband Cyrus K. Holliday in Kansas Territory. This, the second letter he received from her, reported the health of his brother George Holliday's family and mentioned her giving money, earned by selling a locket, to his mother. Mary Holliday eloquently expressed her love and the difficulty of their separation. After joking that her cooking skill should meet Kansas Territory standards, she mentioned the plans of Lowry Trowbridge and George Merriman, Pennsylvanians with Kansas fever.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote twelve pages from Topeka, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. Anxious to have her and their young daughter, Lillie, with him, and unable to come for them himself, Cyrus gave detailed business and travel instructions. He suggested that I. H. Lenhart go to New York to exchange their bonds for gold or bills from the State Bank of Missouri. Mary was to keep the money close and beware of thieves. He also gave instructions concerning route, railroads and steamboats, tickets, baggage, and escorts. Cyrus suggested that Mary travel with F. R. Foster of Spring Corners, Pennsylvania or an agent of an Express Company. Her safety and ease during the nine day journey was his main concern. (Mary and Lillie did not join Cyrus in Topeka until March 1857.)

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote to Mary from Chicago, Illinois, one stop along his journey to Washington, D. C. where he would lobby Congress for assistance with the Atchison and Topeka Railroad. He gave details of his journey and mentioned several people he had or planned to visit en route to Washington. Kansas Territory was suffering an especially severe winter.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from La Porte, Indiana to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Topeka, Kansas Territory. On his way to Washington, D. C. he planned to collect a debt. A friend had given him railway passes to Pittsburgh. The contrast between the quality of life in the northern states and Kansas Territory saddened Cyrus, who quoted a verse. He gave instructions to Mary concerning the livestock and farmland. In a postscript, he emphasized that she save the eyes of potatoes.

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Hiram Hill to Dear Wife

Hill, Hiram, 1804-

Hiram Hill, a resident of Williamsburgh, Massachusetts wrote to his wife from St. Louis, Missouri, on his way to Lawrence, Kansas Territory, where he owned property. Hill had traveled by railroad and boat and was now a passenger on the steamboat Senora. Ticket prices were high due to the late season. Also on board were Erastus D. Ladd, who was elected to the Topeka free state legislature on March 30th, and Thaddeus L. Whitney, a friend and business associate. Hill also mentioned Mr. Pom[e]roy and Mr. Eldridge. Interestingly, a second letter dated December 20 and perhaps from Hill's wife to her sister-in-law (the wife of Hiram's brother Otis) was written on a blank page.

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Ellen Douglas Denison Goodnow to Harriet Goodnow

Goodnow, Ellen Denison (Mrs. Isaac T.)

Ellen Goodnow, recently arrived at her homestead near Manhattan, Kansas Territory, wrote to her sister-in-law Harriet Goodnow in New England, regarding her trip West and her impressions of Kansas Territory. Ellen described her journey in a detailed but concise manner, and, in her first impressions, likened Kansas to "another garden of Eden. . .too good for bondage, or for the oppressor's rod [references to slavery]." A devout Christian woman, she also expressed her opinion that Satan held influence over the Missourians. Despite this ominous presence, Ellen still tried to convince Harriet to join them in the Territory.

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People on a flatbed railroad car

Steele, F. M. (Francis Marion), 1866-1936

This is a view, presumed to have been taken in Haskell County, Kansas, of a large group of people (men and women) on a flat railroad car being pulled by a locomotive. Also visible are a horse-drawn wagon and its driver.

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Land buyers visit Satanta, Haskell County, Kansas

Steele, F. M. (Francis Marion), 1866-1936

This is a view of James Septer Patrick's business building (Jas. S. Patrick Agent for Satanta Lots And Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Lands) in Satanta, Kansas. There is a modified Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe logo on the front of Patrick's building. Some railroads received lands from the federal government. They sold the lands to help raise funds to build the railroad. Also visible in the photograph are the Deal building and a water tower, both under construction, and people seated in four automobiles. The first two cars contain land buyers from Wichita, Kansas (only John Jacob Miller, seated next to the driver in the first car, is identified ), the third car contains Mr. and Mrs. John Henry Johnson from Sublette, Kansas, and James Septer Patrick is alone in the fourth car. Note the steering wheels are on the right side of the cars.

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Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company's Fred Harvey House, Hutchinson, Kansas

This photograph shows a group of Harvey Girls gathered in the dining room of the Harvey House at the Bisonte Hotel in Hutchinson, Kansas. The facility designed by architect J.G. Holland opened in November of 1897. For a number of years the hotel provided service until the late 1940s when it closed its doors due to the decline in rail services. The building was razed between 1964 and 1965.

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Wellington Girl's Band

Dodge, E. L.

Photo of the Wellington Girl's Band standing in front of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Reading Room. In 1913 the Welington Girls' Band played at both the Kansas State Fair and the Oklahoma State Fair. The following are the names of members of the band with instrument each played. CORNETS: Irene Osborne, Pauline Osborne, Claudine Waugh, Velma Prock, Vera Wonder, Marie Thompson, Mary Lamb. HORNS: Jennie Phelps, Esther Liddle, Marguerite Smith, Rosie McKowen, Mollie Harbaugh. BARITONES: Maude Price (Mrs. F.E.) Mildred Schwinn, Ruth Droz. TROMBONES: Ruth McIntypre, Ruth Barner, Glays Robinson, Pauline Nelson. BASES: Pearl Loofburrow, Hazel Brumley, Ruth Infield. DRUMS: Ersel Loofburrow, Leah Knowles. CLARINETS: Mildred Waugh, Bessie Whitmann, Laurina Hunt, Grace Burks, Isabel Brandenberg, Vaughnie Waynick, Alice Rutherford, Essie Davis, Sybella Matthews. SAXAPHONES: Marie Murphy, Vesta Kerns, Cecil Pierpont, Olive Collins, Pansy McIntyre, Emily Bailey.

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