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Page 1 of 10, showing 10 records out of 97 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Dorothea Dix correspondence

Dix, Dorothea Lynde, 1802-1887

Dorothea Dix's papers consist of correspondence from Miss Dix to various people, as well as some correspondence in which Miss Dix was concerned, but not directly involved. Dix was an advocate for social welfare, particularly supporting the establishment and maintenance of mental hospitals for the mentally ill, disabled, or poor. She was instrumental in the proposed legislation of the "Bill for the Benefit of the Indigent Insane." During the Civil War, Dix was appointed Superintendent of Army Nurses. Much of the correspondence concerns Dix's efforts to bring lifeboats and other help to Sable Island in Nova Scotia, an area known for shipwrecks and where many with mental illnesses were sent, sometimes against their will. These papers are part of the historic psychiatry material in the Menninger Archives.

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United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 9, Correspondence

United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Central Superintendency

This volume contains correspondence sent by the Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency in St. Louis, Missouri from 1847-1855. The correspondence was sent by the Superintendents of Indian Affairs to the Commissioners of Indian Affairs. During this period the superintendents included Thomas H. Harvey, David D. Mitchell, and Alfred Cumming; the commissioners included William Medill, Orlando Brown, Luke Lea, and George Washington Manypenny. Topics of discussion focused on the appropriation of federal funds for treaties, the hiring and firing of Indian agents, and the transportation and storage of goods and supplies. Partial funding for the digitization of these records was provided by the National Park Service. A searchable, full-text (PDF) transcription is available under "External Links" below.

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Fire Station no. 4, Topeka, Kansas

This black and white photograph shows a horse drawn fire wagon in front of Fire Station No., 4 located near 8th and Clay in Topeka, Kansas. The men gathered around the wagon have been identified from left to right as: Will Hall, C. McCabe, Captain A.M. Robinson and E.L. Robinson.

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The Plumb Plan of Government Ownership of Railroads

Howe, Frederic Clemson, 1867-1940

Trade union broadside announcement advertising the meeting place of a talk to discuss a proposed plan of government and employee ownership over the railroad industry. Mr. Frederick C.Howe delivered the talk at the City Auditorium, Wednesday Evening, August 13 at 8 O'clock. The exact date and city is unknown, though it may have taken place in Topeka.

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John Palmer Usher

This black and white photograph shows John Palmer Usher (1816-1889). A lawyer from Indiana and a member of President Abraham Lincoln's cabinet. Usher served only two years as the seventh U.S. Secretary of the Interior, (1863-1865), before returning to private life. In 1865, he become the chief counsel for the Kansas Pacific Railroad a position he held until his retirement in 1880. Usher also resumed his political career when he moved to Lawrence, Kansas, in 1872, and was elected to serve one term as the town's mayor (1879 to 1881). On April 13, 1889, at the age of 73, Usher died at the University Hospital in Philadelphia after a lengthy illness. Burial was at Oak Hill Cemetery in Lawrence, Kansas.

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Kansas Adjutant General general correspondence

Kansas. Adjutant General's Office

This correspondence was sent and received by the Kansas Adjutant General's Office. Hiram T. Benam served as Adjutant General from 1876-1878 and Peter S. Noble served from 1878-1883. It includes inquiries made from men "anxious for organization" hoping to enlist militias in the towns of Parsons, Independence, Iuka, Lawrence, and Hutchinson. The collection also includes bill of ladings from the Kansas Pacific Railway and Rock Island (Illinois) Arsenal. Frequent correspondence was exchanged with Willis Brown, cashier for the State Bank of Kansas in Seneca, Kansas, Scott Hopkins of the Kansas University Cadets, John T. Bradley, a lawyer from Council Grove and member of the Kansas Senate from 1876 to 1880, F.C. Merrill, a lumber dealer from Paola, and E.D. Rose, a hardware dealer from Holton.

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Kansas Highway Patrol, Topeka, Kansas

This colored transparency shows Kansas Highway Patrol trooper Dan Baily standing beside his car in front of the state offices, which was the headquarters of the Kansas Highway Patrol, in Topeka, Kansas.

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After the great war is over

This promotional brochure argues that the construction of good roads in the United States will enhance agricultural productivity and economic development in the aftermath of World War I.

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Williard Davis

Mullen

This cabinet card shows Willard Davis, who served as Kansas' 10th Attorney General from January 8, 1877 to January 10, 1881. He was born January 26, 1837 in Madison County, Kentucky. He attended Missouri University, then studied law at Lexington, Kentucky, and was admitted to practice there. When the war began, he was commissioned into the Union army as a Lieutenant in the Thirty-First Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, but his military career was brief due to failing health. On March 14, 1863, Davis was appointed by President Abraham Lincoln as the Internal Revenue Collector for Kentucky. He held the position until September 1, 1866 when he was dismissed for failure to accept President Andrew Johnson's policies. Davis resumed his law career and advocated for civil rights for freed slaves. In the fall of 1870, Davis moved to Neosho Falls, Kansas and became the attorney for the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway Company. The following year he settled in Parsons, Kansas and was elected the town's first mayor. To focus on his political career, he resigned from the railroad in 1873. In 1874, he was elected county attorney for Labette County, Kansas. He held this office until he was elected in 1876 to serve as Attorney General for the State of Kansas. After two terms he returned to his private law practice. On December 6, 1885 at the age of forty-eight, he passed away after a lengthy illness at his home at Eleventh and Van Buren Street in Topeka, Kansas.

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City prison, Topeka, Kansas

This black and white photograph shows four police officers on horse back and a horse-drawn paddy wagon in front of the city prison at the northwest corner of 5th & Jackson Street in Topeka, Kansas.

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