Jump to Navigation

Facet Browse

Business and Industry (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Lodging (Remove)
Home and Family (Remove)
Date (Remove)
Type of Material (Remove)
People (Remove)
Page 1 of 4, showing 10 records out of 38 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

<< previous| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4|

Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Thomas Hopkins Webb to Martin Franklin Conway

Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866

Thomas H. Webb, secretary of the New England Emigrant Aid Company, wrote from Boston, Massachusetts to Martin F. Conway, general agent for the New England Emigrant Aid Company in Kansas Territory. Webb provided instructions to Conway on several New England Emigrant Aid Company business matters including the sale of property in Atchison, Kansas Territory. Webb state that it would be desirable to hold the Atchison property until real estate values increased, but he informed Conway that the Company needed cash immediately and that the properties should be sold as soon as possible.

previewthumb

Thomas Hopkins Webb to Martin Franklin Conway

Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866

Thomas H. Webb, secretary of the New England Emigrant Aid Company, wrote from Boston, Massachusetts to Martin F. Conway, general agent for the New England Emigrant Aid Company in Kansas Territory. Webb informed Conway of the Company's desire to end its operations in Kansas as soon as possible. He recommended that Conway sell the Company's mill equipment at a low price and suggested that he sell it to the Batchelder Town Company. In a postscript, Webb urged Conway to prepare information to present to the territorial legislature related to Company claims for losses during the early territorial troubles, particularly for losses incurred during the May 1856 sack of Lawrence.

previewthumb

Martin Franklin Conway to New England Emigrant Aid Company, Financial Statements

Conway, M. F. (Martin Franklin), 1827-1882

These monthly financial statements, submitted by Martin F. Conway, general agent for the New England Emigrant Aid Company in Kansas Territory, detailed company income and expenditures for a six month period between July and December 1858. Conway provided particularly full accounts of his traveling expenses during frequent trips around the territory.

previewthumb

New England Emigrant Aid Company, Annual Meeting Minutes

New England Emigrant Aid Company

Proceedings of the New England Emigrant Aid Company stockholders meetings. The meetings typically involved the election of officers, a treasurer's report, consideration of resolutions, and an assessment of the company's prospects in Kansas. The minutes for the first meeting of the New England Emigrant Aid Company (March 5, 1855) included the corporation by-laws.

previewthumb

National Kansas Relief Committee, minutes

National Kansas Committee

This document details the minutes of three meetings of the Kansas Relief Committee, otherwise known as the National Kansas Committee, held in 1856 on June 9th, June 21st, and June 26th. It also includes information about the membership of this emigrant aid company. The first of these meetings adopted resolutions to aid the plight of free-state settlers in Kansas Territory. Furthermore, the members of the committee decided to establish five thousand settlers in Kansas Territory and to give them a year's worth of provisions.

previewthumb

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Topeka, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. After a loving introduction, he described Kansas Territory's sunny, breezy climate. Holliday mentioned letters received from his brother and Mr. Thomas Willson, both named in previous letters, who also wanted to emigrate. He described the principle building in Topeka, which served as meeting hall, hotel, and church, and where he slept with Frye W. Giles, a free state supporter from Chicago. Holliday ended with concern for Lizzie, Mary Holliday's younger sister.

previewthumb

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, where he had stopped on his way to visit Governor Andrew H. Reeder at the Shawnee Indian Mission. Holliday hoped to make the growing Topeka the capital of Kansas Territory. In Lawrence, a hotel keeper had died and George W. Brown, editor of the Herald of Freedom, was ill. Despite mail-delaying winter storms further east, the weather continued mildly. Holliday described his financial investments and requested money for his trip to Meadville, more urgent as the birth of their first child approached.

previewthumb

William Y. Roberts and Samuel Clarke Pomeroy to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

Roberts, William Y

William Y. Roberts and Samuel C. Pomeroy reported their activities from Willard's, a hotel popular with wealthy congressmen in Washington, D. C., to Cyrus K. Holliday in Topeka, Kansas Territory. They described the legislators' and President Franklin Pierce's eagerness to resolve K. T. troubles. While approving the July 4th meeting of the free state legislature, they cautioned Holliday to promote peace.

previewthumb

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Three days after the Pennsylvania state election, Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Monongahela House, a hotel in Pittsburgh, PA to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville. The election results were unofficial, and Cyrus hoped that John C. Fremont, republican presidential candidate, had won at least by a slim majority, if not by the expected large margin. Concerned about the November 4th national election, Cyrus anticipated fraud in Kansas Territory and prayed that the people would "do right." He mentioned the counties in which he had spoken; his next stop, Philadelphia; and his planned return to counties near Meadville.

previewthumb

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, who, accompanied by Mrs. Edward C. K. Garvey, had returned to Meadville, Pennsylvania to give birth to her second child. Meanwhile, Cyrus Holliday (who was Vice President of the upper territorial legislative body, the Council) had passed four bills, including one establishing Topeka as the Shawnee county seat. He bought new clothes for the session, since Lawrence had become more refined, with a new hotel. Holliday mentioned emigration to Pikes Peak, the Topeka bridge, trouble in L[i]nn county, and meeting three women, Mrs. Smith, Mrs. [Robert] Morrow, and Mrs. O'Donell (possibly Mrs. William O'Donnall) in Lawrence. He proposed that Liz, Mary Holliday's younger sister, return with her.

previewthumb
<< previous| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4|

Business and Industry

Business and Industry -- Lodging

Home and Family

Date

Type of Material

People

Agriculture

Built Environment

Collections

Community Life

Curriculum

Education

Environment

Government and Politics

Military

Objects and Artifacts

Places

Thematic Time Period

Transportation