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Thematic Time Period -- Trails, 1821 - 1880 (Remove)
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Page 1 of 1, showing 7 records out of 7 total, starting on record 1, ending on 7

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Samuel Reader's diary, volume 6

Reader, Samuel James, 1836-1914

This volume of Samuel Reader's diary covers April 1864-July 1869. Reader also referred to this work as his private journal and day book. Reader lived in Indianola, Kansas, in Shawnee County. In addition to English, Reader writes the diary in French and in shorthand.

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XIT mess wagon, Channing, Texas

Steele, F. M. (Francis Marion), 1866-1936

Members of the XIT ranch's round-up crew seated on the ground eating a meal near the chuckwagon. Also visible in the photograph are rolled up canvasses and horses. The XIT was the largest outfit in the United States, with 2 million acres of pasture land. This 1897 photograph was taken on the trail near their headquarters in Buffalo Springs, Texas.

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Cowboys camped out on the trail

Steele, F. M. (Francis Marion), 1866-1936

View of a round-up crew seated on the ground eating a meal near a chuck wagon. Rolled up canvasses and horses are also visible in the photograph.

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Lange's Drug Store, Leavenworth, Kansas

This photograph shows an exterior view of Lange's Drug Store on the corner of 4th and Shawnee streets in Leavenworth, Kansas. A sign advertising "Drugs and Medicines" and showing the traditional mortar and pestle pharmacy symbol is visible. The large sign on the right side of the building reads, "Lange's Drug Store. Drugs and medicines, paints, oils, brushes, and glass. Choice wines and liquors. Fine perfumery, toilet articles, soaps, sponges. Trusses a specialty. Prescriptions compounded day and night. Old Wizard oil, best family medicine." The sign farther to the right advertises "Tutt's Liver Pills." The sign above the arched window on the corner reads "Apotheke," the German word for a pharmacy . The sign to the left reads "Adolf Lange." Other businesses visible to the left of the picture include a store for boots and shoes, and a store with a sign reading, "Commission. Gus. O. L. Sauer." Two horse-drawn wagons are visible on the left, and trolley tracks are visible running along the dirt street. This same building was previously the Central Drug Store owned by Theodore Egersdorff.

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Crossing the Plains, the journal of Harriett Bidwell Shaw

Shaw, Harriet Bidwell

Harriett Bidwell Shaw started a journal in September 18,1851, when she and her husband, Reverend James Milton Shaw traveled in a wagon train via the Santa Fe Trail to New Mexico. Harriett was the only woman to accompany the wagon train. She documented their daily activities, the weather conditions, hardships on the trail, encounters with Indians, and buffalo hunting. When the Shaws passed through Kansas they stayed at Shawnee Baptist Mission, Council Grove, and Pawnee Rock and stopped near Fort Mackey on the Arkansas river. They reached Santa Fe on November 14, 1851, where the journal ends. The Shaws eventually went to Albuquerque and then Socorro to establish Baptist missions among the Spanish people. In sum, Shaws journal presents a remarkable picture of the difficulties and rewards of travel to the American West prior to the American Civil War.

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William Allen White

This is a colorized photo of William Allen White as a child. As publisher and editor of the Emporia Gazette newspaper, White gained national fame with his editorial "What's the Matter with Kansas?" during the Populist era in the 1890s. A supporter of the Progressive movement, he wrote countless editorials as well as articles for national magazines and books. In 1924, he ran for governor of Kansas to highlight his campaign against the Ku Klux Klan.

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James Butler (Wild Bill) Hickok family collection

Hickok family

A collection of fifty-six letters from the family of James Butler ("Wild Bill") Hickok. The letters describe the adventures of the Hickok children (including Wild Bill) in California, Kansas, Missouri and elsewhere, and their parents and family in Troy Grove, Illinois. After Wild Bill's death in Deadwood, Dakota Territory, in 1876, the letters mostly concern his burial, the maintenance of his grave, and his reputation. Correspondents also include Agnes Hickok (Wild Bill's wife), William "Buffalo Bill" Cody, and Charlie H. Utter ("Colorado Charlie"). Ethel Ann Hickok, the last surviving niece of Wild Bill, donated fifty-four letters to the Kansas Historical Society and two letters to historian Joseph G. Rosa in the 1980s. The two Rosa letters (June 6, 1861; March 23, 1880) are included here by permission. The William F. Cody letter to Horace Hickok dated March 23, 1880 originally owned by Joe Rosa was donated to the Kansas State Historical Society on January 9, 2017. Ethel Hickok passed away in 1985 eight months before her 100th birthday. Ethel's niece Edith Harmon and historian Joseph G. Rosa assisted with the donations.

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