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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 16 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Fern Gayden

This is a photograph of Fern Gayden possibly taken in Dunlap, Kansas. Fern Gayden was born September 29, 1904, in Dunlap, Kansas, where she attended elementary and secondary schools. She went on to attend Kansas State Teachers College at Emporia and taught school for one year. Fern Gayden moved to Chicago at the age of 23. She had a 50-year career as a social worker but became best known as a literary, fine arts, and political activist. A founding member of the South Side Writers Group in the 1930s, Fern Gayden's long and diverse career included leadership roles in the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom and the South Side Community Art Center. During World War II, she co-published Negro Story magazine with Alice Browning.

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Historic Psychiatry original miscellaneous documents

These are a variety of handwritten and typed letters, lectures, autographs, news clippings, biographical information, images and sketches, court documents, and other documents related to the history of psychiatry. These documents are housed in four boxes and the folders within are arranged alphabetically by surname or title, and they are included in the larger collection of historic psychiatry material in the Menninger Archives. Authors come from such fields as medicine, religion, prison and other reform and advocacy movements, politics, the military, etc. The documents themselves sometimes provide significant information, and sometimes they were collected because their authors were significant historical figures. Some of the individuals found in Box 1 include James Mark Baldwin, Ludwig Binswanger, Eugen Bleuler, Jean-Martin Charcot, Elizabeth Fry, Oliver Wendell Holmes, and Carl Jung. Some of the individuals found in Box 2 include Alfred Adler, Robert Frost, and Washinton Irving. This box also includes a 68-page handwritten notebook by Dr. W.W. Reed entitled "Reminiscenses About the Treatment of the Insane." Some of the individuals found in Box 3 include Amariah Brigham and Frederick van Eeden. This box also includes a correspondence file (1883-1888) on Ellen Kehoe, a patient at the Worcester Lunatic Hospital in Massachusetts, and a series of drawings from the 1920s and 1930s by a Belgian patient suffering from paranoia named Andreas at the Kankakee State Hospital in Illinois. The drawings were donated by Dr. J.B. Gier, formerly of the Topeka Veteran's Administration Hospital, who knew the patient and encouraged his work. Box 4 includes a miscellaneous folder regarding insane asylums and contains legal documents, postcard images, and receipts for services. Languages include English, German, French and Italian, and transcriptions or translations follow some of the documents.

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Richard Josiah Hinton

A pencil drawing of Richard Josiah Hinton, 1830-1901. Hinton a New York journalist and an anti-slavery advocate moved to the Kansas territory in June of 1856 to battle against the expansion of slavery in the new territory. Shortly after his arrival in Lawrence, KS, Hinton soon advocated against slavery by writing to Eastern newspapers about the turbulent affairs in the Kansas territory. The numerous newspaper articles penned by Hinton reflected the individuals' views and opinions of a free-state without the institution of slavery. By the early part of 1862, Hinton was recruiting volunteers for the First Kansas Colored Infantry Regiment, and was appointed the rank of first lieutenant to the Regiment. He continued to move up in the military ranks with the promotion to captain of Company B, Second Kansas Colored on October 21, 1863. In November of 1856, Hinton mustered out of military service having reached the brevet rank of colonel. He finished the war serving as acting inspector general of the Freedman's Bureau as well as being sent to the South for secret service work ordered by President Abraham Lincoln. Following the war Hinton contributed articles to many different magazines and wrote several books, including John Brown and His Men: With Some Account of the Roads They Traveled to Reach Harpers Ferry (1894), an admiring biography of Hinton's old leader and hero. He, also, held several politically appointed positions within the federal government (i.e., United States commissioner of emigration in Europe in 1867; inspector of U.S. consulates in Europe; special agent to President Ulysses S. Grant to Vienna in 1873; special agent to the Departments of Treasury and State on the frontier and in Mexico in 1883; irrigation engineer to the U.S. Geological Survey from 1889-1890; and special agent in charge of the Department of Agriculture from 1890 to 1892.) While on business in London, England, Hinton died suddenly on December 20, 1901.

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Eugene Ware correspondence

This is a series of correspondence to and from Eugene Fitch Ware (1841-1911). Ware moved to Fort Scott, Kansas, after the Civil War and became employed at the Fort Scott Monitor. In 1879, Ware began the first of three terms in the Kansas State Senate. During his terms of office, Ware introduced bills concerning railroads, life insurance, militia, and relief and support of the poor as well as bills of a more local nature. Ware moved to Topeka in 1893 to become a partner with Charles Gleed and his brother, James, forming the law firm of Gleed, Ware and Gleed. In addition to journalism, law, and politics, Ware used the pseudonym, Ironquill, for his literary and poetic achievements. His works include "Neutralia" and "The Rhymes of Ironquill". For a complete contents list of the papers of Eugene Fitch Ware, see the External Links below.

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William Addison Phillips

Portrait of William Addison Phillips, an author, lawyer, journalist and politician. In 1857, Phillips attended the Constitution Convention at Topeka and the Free State Conventions at Centropolis, Lawrence, and Grasshopper Falls. He founded the town of Salina in April, 1858. In that same month and year, Phillips was nominated at the Topeka Free-State Convention under the Leavenworth Constitution to serve as a supreme court judge. He attended the Convention at Osawatomie and the Republican State Convention at Lawrence in 1859. Phillips served in the Kansas Volunteer Regiments and rose to the rank of colonel. From March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1875 Phillips was an at large representative to the United States Congress and from March 4, 1875 to March 3, 1879 he represented the First District.

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Richard Josiah Hinton

A black and white photo of Richard Josiah Hinton, 1830-1901. Hinton a New York journalist and an anti-slavery advocate moved to the Kansas territory, in June of 1856, to battle against the expansion of slavery in the new territory. Shortly after his arrival in Lawrence, KS, Hinton soon advocated against slavery by writing to Eastern newspapers about the turbulent affairs in the Kansas territory. The numerous newspaper articles penned by Hinton reflected the individual's views and opinions of a free-state without the institution of slavery. By the early part of 1862, Hinton was recruiting volunteers for the First Kansas Colored Infantry Regiment, and was appointed the rank of first lieutenant to the Regiment. He continued to move up in the military ranks with the promotion to captain of Company B, Second Kansas Colored on October 21, 1863. In November of 1856, Hinton mustered out of military service having reached the brevet rank of colonel. He finished the war serving as acting inspector general of the Freeman's Bureau as well as being sent to the South for secret service work ordered by President Abraham Lincoln. Following the war Hinton contributed articles to many different magazines and wrote several books, including John Brown and His Men: With Some Account of the Roads They Traveled to Reach Harpers Ferry (1894), an admiring biography of Hinton's old leader and hero. He, also, held several politically appointed positions within the federal government (i.e., United States commissioner of emigration in Europe in 1867; inspector of U.S. consulates in Europe; special agent to President Ulysses S. Grant to Vienna in 1873; special agent to the Departments of Treasury and State on the frontier and in Mexico in 1883; irrigation engineer to the U.S. Geological Survey from 1889-1890; and special agent in charge of the Department of Agriculture from 1890 to 1892.) While on business in London, England, Hinton died suddenly on December 20, 1901.

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Richard Josiah Hinton

A sepia colored portrait of Richard Josiah Hinton, 1830-1901. Hinton a New York journalist and an anti-slavery advocate moved to the Kansas territory, in June of 1856, to battle against the expansion of slavery in the new territory. Shortly after his arrival in Lawrence, KS, Hinton soon advocated against slavery by writing to Eastern newspapers about the turbulent affairs in the Kansas territory. The numerous newspaper articles penned by Hinton reflected the individual's views and opinions of a free-state without the institution of slavery. By the early part of 1862, Hinton was recruiting volunteers for the First Kansas Colored Infantry Regiment, and was appointed the rank of first lieutenant to the Regiment. He continued to move up in the military ranks with the promotion to captain of Company B, Second Kansas Colored on October 21, 1863. In November of 1865, Hinton mustered out of military service having reached the brevet rank of colonel. He finished the war serving as acting inspector general of the Freedman's Bureau as well as being sent to the South for secret service work ordered by President Abraham Lincoln. Following the war Hinton contributed articles to many different magazines and wrote several books, including John Brown and His Men: With Some Account of the Roads They Traveled to Reach Harpers Ferry (1894), an admiring biography of Hinton's old leader and hero. He, also, held several politically appointed positions within the federal government (i.e., United States commissioner of emigration in Europe in 1867; inspector of U.S. consulates in Europe; special agent to President Ulysses S. Grant to Vienna in 1873; special agent to the Departments of Treasury and State on the frontier and in Mexico in 1883; irrigation engineer to the U.S. Geological Survey from 1889-1890; and special agent in charge of the Department of Agriculture from 1890 to 1892.) While on business in London, England, Hinton died suddenly on December 20, 1901.

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Richard Josiah Hinton

A sepia colored photo of Richard Josiah Hinton, 1830-1901. Hinton a New York journalist and an anti-slavery advocate moved to the Kansas territory, in June of 1856, to battle against the expansion of slavery in the new territory. Shortly after his arrival in Lawrence, KS, Hinton soon advocated against slavery by writing to Eastern newspapers about the turbulent affairs in the Kansas territory.

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Rolla Anderson Clymer

Rolla Anderson Clymer, editor of the El Dorado Times for 59 years, wrote numerous articles and poems about the Flint Hills region. His best known poem "Majesty of the Hills" earned him the designation as Poet Laureate of the Flint Hills. He took an active role in Republican party politics and served on Alf Landon's presidential campaign in 1936.

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Sara Tappan Lawrence Robinson

This portrait represents the free-state activist and author, Sara Tappan Lawrence Robinson. She was the wife of Kansas first Governor Charles Robinson. The portrait presented here is a digital reproduction from an ambrotype taken in 1857.

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