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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 18 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Dental care, Kansas City, Kansas

United States. Works Progress Administration

A young boy getting his teeth cleaned by a dentist in Kansas City, Kansas. This service was provided by the Works Progress Administration's domestic science and food project.

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Walter Pearce Hull photograph collection

Walter Pearce Hull, 1870-1956

This series of photographs was taken by Walter Pearce Hull. He was born November 22, 1870, in Eyota, Minnesota, grew up in Athens, Alabama, and moved to Kansas as a young man. His parents were Joseph Gould Hull, born May 4, 1840 in Orangeville, Ohio and Eliza Jane Westfall, born October 29, 1847 in Bushnell, Illinois. By 1894 he was manager of the Northrup Store in Colony. He served as a 1st Lt. In the 20th Kansas Infantry, U.S. Volunteers, 1898-99, during the Philippine-American War, serving on Frederick Funston's staff. He returned to Iola after he was discharged and was manager of the Northrup store there. Hull was a skilled amateur photographer. Many of the photos were taken while he was courting Lenna Myrtle Jolliffe, 1908-1909. They married December 22, 1909 in Bentonville, Arkansas. They lived at 420 S. Washington Street, Iola and had three children: Harriet, born September 29, 1910, Berrien Jolliffe, born October 15, 1913, and Lenna Doris, born December 3, 1915.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday, the founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. He told her of his planned trip up the Kansas River, his pleasure in the people of Kansas Territory, and a Thanksgiving dinner he attended. Unwilling to return to Pennsylvania, Holliday expressed desire that Mary come to Kansas Territory and described the construction of a friend's sod-covered "mansion," one such as Clarina I. H. Nichols, a lecturer and writer, inhabited.

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Millard F. Marks' residence, Valley Falls, Kansas

A photograph showing Dr. and Mrs. Millard F. Marks standing in front of their residence. Visible is his carriage and team parked on the street. In addition to his medical practice, he was a Populist and served as a member of the 1897-1899 Kansas House of Representatives from District 5.

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Ephraim Nute to Amos Adams Lawrence

Nute, Ephraim

Transcription of a letter from the Amos Adams Lawrence Collection, Massachusetts Historical Society. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, wrote to Amos A. Lawrence in Massachusetts, regarding the subject of a college. A well-attended town meeting had been held in which the idea had been discussed, though all seemed only "a castle in the air" but for Lawrence's "liberal offer" (presumably of funding) which was the "first step toward the realization of his project." The general opinion of the people was that the college should be constructed outside the town limits "on the high prairie or table land." Nute also mentioned the steps being taken to establish free public schools in the city, of upper and lower grades.

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Edmund Jones to Hiram Hill

Jones, Edmund

Edmund Jones wrote briefly from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Hiram Hill in Williamsburgh, Massachusetts. He referred to the security of town lots and a previously sent newspaper. Mr. Fuller, a delinquent renter, was "selling liquor" in Hill's house. Jones suggested that Hill come soon.

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Kansas Emergency Relief Committee accomplishments movie

Kansas. Emergency Relief Commission

This motion picture film documents the various work projects completed in Kansas during President Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal. It begins with an introduction to the Kansas Emergency Relief Committee personnel, starting with the executive director, John G. Stutz. It then shows the various projects across the state, including the construction of farm ponds and lakes as part of the Water Conservation Program, the renovation and construction of courthouses, schools, libraries, and other public buildings, and the weaving and sewing rooms that produced clothing for needy Kansans. It also includes footage of rabbit drives, dust storms, and women sweeping piles of dust out of their homes. Click on the thumbnails below to play each clip. Click on Text Version for a detailed description of each chapter.

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Library, Topeka, Kansas

United States. Works Progress Administration

Library employees working in a library,Topeka, Kansas. Some of the workers were trained by the Works Progress Administration's library service program.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Topeka, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. After a loving introduction, he described Kansas Territory's sunny, breezy climate. Holliday mentioned letters received from his brother and Mr. Thomas Willson, both named in previous letters, who also wanted to emigrate. He described the principle building in Topeka, which served as meeting hall, hotel, and church, and where he slept with Frye W. Giles, a free state supporter from Chicago. Holliday ended with concern for Lizzie, Mary Holliday's younger sister.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday, founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. After three weeks at the future site of Topeka, Holliday was glad for city comforts. He mentioned the site's beauty, the prospect of building a house on his farm claim, and his personal success since leaving Meadville. On December 18, 1854, he had been unanimously elected President of the Topeka Town Association and appointed temporary agent of the New England Emigrant Aid Company. The bottom two-thirds of page 3 and 4 (which contained Holliday's signature) have been cut and removed.

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