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Page 1 of 8, showing 10 records out of 78 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Dental care, Kansas City, Kansas

United States. Works Progress Administration

A young boy getting his teeth cleaned by a dentist in Kansas City, Kansas. This service was provided by the Works Progress Administration's domestic science and food project.

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Your city can protect the babies

Kansas. State Board of Health

This poster issued by the Kansas State Board of Health describes how a community can help keep babies healthy.

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Recreation center, Junction City, Kansas

United States. Works Progress Administration

African American soldiers and their dates are looking at magazines at a recreation center for servicemen and factory personnel, Junction City, Kansas. The recreation center was part of the Works Progress Administration.

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Post office in Geneva, Kansas

A photograph of the Geneva, Kansas post office. A man, possibly postmaster D.D. Spicer, can be seen reading in front of the building.

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Kansas Girls Industrial School. Graduating into society

This silent film documents the State Industrial School for Girls in Beloit, Kansas, and depicts every aspect of the school's educational, vocational, and boarding programs. The Women's Christian Temperance Union established the school in 1889 and it was later acquired by the state. The purpose of the school was to reform economically or socially disadvantaged girls between twelve and sixteen years old. The school taught sewing, weaving, cooking, gardening and horticulture, wood carving, clay modeling, and the general duties of the household. The film showcases the following programs and activities: healthcare and hospital, housework, laundry, sewing, bakery, cooking, religious instruction, student government, dancing, table tennis, roller skating, Independence Day parade, flag drill, folk dance, track and field, and patriotic instruction. At the time the film was made the school included seven housing units (or cottages), a schoolhouse and farm buildings on 200 acres. Directed by Grace A. Miles. Photographed by Joseph A. Thompson.

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Horse sale, Santa Fe, Haskell County, Kansas

Steele, F. M. (Francis Marion), 1866-1936

There was brisk trading in Santa Fe, Kansas, whenever a herd of sleek horses like these were offered for sale, as the pioneers were unaccustomed to the benefits of motorized farming, and even motor cars were a rarity. John Jacob Miller is shown facing the camera (sixth man from the right, dressed in a hat, tie, white shirt, and vest). Also visible in the photograph are the Haskell County courthouse, Cave's Store, and Frank McCoy Lands. Santa Fe was the first county seat of Haskell County, Kansas. In 1912, the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railroad built a line from Dodge City, Kansas, to Elkhart, Texas, that bypassed the town by seven miles. In 1920, the Haskell Country seat was moved to Sublette, which had prospered by being on the AT&SF rail line, and Santa Fe faded away into a ghost town.

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Milk maids at the Kansas Women's Industrial Farm, Lansing, Kansas

This photograph shows the dairy barn and milk maids at the Kansas Women's Industrial Farm in Lansing, Kansas. In 1916, this facility was established, and, for a year, it was a branch of the men's prison at the Kansas State Penitentiary in Leavenworth County. In 1917, it began operating as a separate, satellite unit. The Industrial Farm was under the supervision of the State Board of Administration before coming under the control of the Board of Penal Institutions, which was eventually reorganized as the Department of Corrections. It housed women who had committed crimes against the state. In 1980, the facility became co-correctional and the name was changed to the Kansas Correctional Institution at Lansing in 1983.

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Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas

Hall Stationery Co., Topeka, KS

This colored postcard shows the Bennett home at the corner of Eighth and Buchanan Streets in Topeka, Kansas. Designed by architect Seymour Davis, the home was built between 1886 and 1888 for Erasmus Bennett, a breeder and importer of registered draft horses. The two-story red brick structure trimmed in terra cotta had a hint of a Tudor style with the tall towers and turrets. The Bennett family lived in this ornate home until 1901, when the state of Kansas purchased the residence for $26,000 for a governor's mansion. As governors came and went, changes in decor were made to the home. The only major structural change to the mansion, was the addition of a sleeping porch built on to the rear. In 1910, Gov. W.R. Stubbs had the red bricks painted yellow but later they were painted white and remained so for the life of the house. As the years passed efforts continued to be made toward the upkeep of the mansion, but it would not be enough to keep ahead of the rapid deterioration. On January 28, 1962, the last official function, a pre-Kansas Day reception, was held at the governor's mansion and by January of 1965, the home was demolished.

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Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas

Strickrott, John F.

This sepia colored photograph shows Governor Willis Joshua Bailey and wife Ida standing on the steps of the Bennett home at the corner of Eighth and Buchanan Streets in Topeka, Kansas. Designed by architect Seymour Davis, the home was built between 1886 and 1888 for Erasmus Bennett, a breeder and importer of registered draft horses. The two-story red brick structure trimmed in terra cotta had a hint of a Tudor style with the tall towers and turrets. The Bennett family lived in this ornate home until 1901, when the state of Kansas purchased the residence for $26,000 for a governor's mansion. As governors came and went, changes in décor were made to the home. The only major structural change to the mansion, was the addition of a sleeping porch built on to the rear. In 1910, Governor W.R. Stubbs had the red bricks painted yellow but later they were painted white and remained so for the life of the house. As the years passed efforts continued to be made toward the upkeep of the mansion, but it would not be enough to keep ahead of the rapid deterioration. On January 28, 1962 the last official function, a pre-Kansas Day reception, was held at the governor's mansion and by January of 1965, the home was demolished. Willis Bailey was the governor of Kansas when this photo was taken in 1903.

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Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas

This sepia colored photograph shows the Bennett home at the corner of Eighth and Buchanan Streets in Topeka, Kansas. Designed by architect Seymour Davis, the home was built between 1886 and 1888 for Erasmus Bennett, a breeder and importer of registered draft horses. The two-story red brick structure trimmed in terra cotta, had a hint of a Tudor style with the tall towers and turrets. The Bennett family lived in this ornate home until 1901, when the state of Kansas purchased the residence for $26,000 for a governor's mansion. As governors came and went, changes in decor were made to the home. The only major structural change to the mansion, was the addition of a sleeping porch built on to the rear. In 1910, Governor W.R. Stubbs had the red bricks painted yellow but later they were pained white and remained so for the life of the house. As the years passed efforts continued to be made toward the upkeep of the mansion, but it would not be enough to keep ahead of the rapid deterioration. On January 28, 1962 the last official function, a pre-Kansas Day reception, was held at the governor's mansion and by January of 1965, the home was demolished. Willis Bailey was Governor of Kansas when this photo was taken.

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