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Community Life -- Clubs and organizations -- Charitable -- Relief (Remove)
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Page 1 of 1, showing 10 records out of 10 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Kansas Relief Committee storehouse at Atchison, Kansas

New York Illustrated News

This illustration was copied from the New York Illustrated News showing destitute settlers waiting for supplies at the Kansas Relief Committee storehouse in Atchison, Kansas. The territory experienced a long period of drought from June 1859 through November 1860. As a result, settlers in rural areas suffered the most. With failed crops and limited supplies, thousands of people left the territory and returned to the East. S. C. Pomeroy was the agent for the relief committee.

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Action of Other Cities on the 'Exodus' Question

Wyandotte Gazette

This article includes information about Exoduster relief efforts in both Topeka and Lawrence. In Topeka, the Kansas Freedmen?s Aid Association had appealed to other counties, asking them to form local aid societies to assist refugees in their respective areas. Lawrence citizens held a meeting in Fraser Hall to discuss the Exodus; the attendees recognized the legitimacy of the Exodus and were willing to provide aid and support for the emigrants.

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Recollections of early days in Kansas

Baker, Orinda S.

This reminiscence, published in two parts, details the experiences of Orinda S. Baker and her family, who moved to Centralia, Nemaha County, in 1860. The Bakers, like other Kansas families, suffered from hunger and sickness during the severe drought that struck Kansas that same year. Included at the end of Part I there are two letters regarding the drought and the aid received from the East. Part II begins with a letter from Phil C. Day regarding relief goods sent to Kansas; Baker had written to out-of-state friends about the suffering of Kansans and acted as coordinator of relief supplies. In January 1862 Baker and her family moved to Topeka when her husband, Floyd P. Baker, was elected to the State House of Representatives. The rest of her reminiscence relates her experiences while living in Topeka, with the exception of a selection discussing a particularly fierce snow storm that hit on January 18, 1861.

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New York Daily Tribune, "The Drouth and Famine in Kansas"

New York Daily Tribune

This newspaper article, published in the New York Daily Tribune from October 10, 1860, outlined the basic details of the suffering and destitution of settlers in Kansas. It also included reprints of two circulars originating from Kansas Territory. One was from the Presbytery of Highland, and the other was from the Central Relief Committee based in Leavenworth. The first reprinted circular provided information about the dire situation and gave the names of the members of this committee. The second circular requested that the elders and deacons of each church in Kansas ascertain how many families needed immediate assistance in order to present a full report to the Central Relief Committee.

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Thaddeus Hyatt's Letters from Kansas. The fact of the Drougth. Introduction of the facts, an appeal and an apology! (No. 1)

Hyatt, Thaddeus

This item is titled "Thaddeus Hyatt's Letters from Kansas, The fact of the Drougth. Introduction of the facts, an appeal and an apology! Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee, tries to dispel reports coming from Leavenworth that conditions in Kansas Territory were being exaggerated. He feels efforts to deny "the present deplorable condition of things" are motivated by economic concerns. Hyatt writes that they suffered because of the drought, not their own actions, and that the free North should aid them. The letter contains a great deal of emotional rhetoric. The letter was copied (by hand) by W. F. M. Arny. The last page of the letter describes its origins.

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Kansas Relief Committee, newspaper article

Smith, I. N.

This article, published in the Haverhill, Massachusetts Tri-Weekly Publisher, lists the contributions collected by their local Kansas Relief Committee. A number of different churches in the area donated cash, and the committee also sent varied articles of clothing (listed in the article) to General S.C. Pomeroy of Atchison.

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New England Kansas Aid committee, Aid for Kansas

This article declares that the New England Kansas Aid Committee has received generous contributions for the free state settlers in Kansas. It also mentions that since the immediate needs of the settlers have been cared for, the most urgent need now is for investments in land and labor.

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National Kansas Committee, request for clothing and provisions

National Kansas Committee

This advertisement was attached to a receipt for the placement of a notice in the New York Times. The advertisement included information about how the people of New England could aid the fight for freedom in Kansas--both with funds and with labor. It also gave the names of National Kansas Committee members and an address for their New York office.

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National Kansas Committee, call for meeting

Hurd, H. B.

This advertisement, posted by H.B. Hurd, secretary of the National Kansas Committee, called a meeting for the purpose of hearing reports from the central committees of the various states.

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Kansas Refugees

Chicago Inter-Ocean

Horatio N. Rust, secretary of the Southern Refuge Relief Association, sent this letter to the editor of the Chicago Inter Ocean to pass along news from Elizabeth Comstock, agent of the Kansas Freedmen?s Relief Association based in Topeka. Comstock feared for the health of 500 refugees, and so Rust asked for contributions of money, bedding, or clothing to send off immediately.

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