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Page 1 of 1, showing 9 records out of 9 total, starting on record 1, ending on 9

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Johnston Lykins

Johnston Lykins was a well-known missionary, physician, and translator who worked with the Pottawatomi and Shawnee Indians who had moved to Indian Territory (present-day Kansas) after the passage of the Indian Removal Act in 1830. In 1831, after serving as a missionary to the Indian tribes in Indiana and Michigan, Lykins and his first wife Delilah (McCoy) Lykins moved to Indian Territory. Lykins and his father-in-law, Isaac McCoy, established the Shawnee Indian Baptist Mission in present-day Johnson County, Kansas. In addition to his responsibilities as a physician, Lykins worked as a translator and developed a system of Indian orthography that allowed the Shawnee people to read and write in their native language. He edited and published the first paper printed in Shawnee, called the Sinwiowe Kesibwi (Shawnee Sun). In the spring of 1843, Lykins founded a mission among the Pottawatomi near what is today Topeka. Due, perhaps, to inter-denominational conflicts and other problems with the mission, Lykins left the Pottawatomi mission and moved to Kansas City, Missouri. He served as the second mayor of Kansas City in 1854, and he remained in residence there until his death in 1876.

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The Topeka daily capital. Sheldon edition

Sheldon, Charles Monroe, 1857-1946

Congregational minister, Charles M. Sheldon is best known for his book, In His Steps (published in 1897), and for his efforts to obtain better educational opportunities for African Americans living in Tennessee Town (a former district of Topeka, Kansas). In March 1900, Frederick O. Popenoe, editor and owner of The Topeka Daily Capital, gave Sheldon complete control over the paper for a week. Sheldon tried to publish the paper as he thought Jesus would, refusing to print "hard" news or ads for tobacco, alcohol or patent medicines. Circulation rose from 15,000 daily copies to well over 350,000. He listed every person, including the janitor, in the editorial column except for Popenoe who had angered Sheldon by hiring an agent to advertise the special editions. All six issues of Sheldon's edition are included here. A searchable transcription is not yet available.

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Robert Simerwell, Quarterly Statement to the American Baptist Publication Society

Simerwell, Robert, 1786-1868

This quarterly statement was written by Robert Simerwell, a missionary colporteur with the American Baptist Publication Society. It contains the dollar amounts for the number of books on hand, his salary for one month, and the amount from book sales, among other items.

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Jotham Meeker to Rev. Lucius Bolles

Meeker, Jotham, 1804-1855

Jotham Meeker, a missionary to the Ottawa Indians, wrote this letter to his contact on the Baptist Board of Foreign Missions, Reverend Lucius Bolles. From this letter, it appears that the Ottawa had become more interested in Christianity. Furthermore, Meeker wanted an assistant to help in printing evangelical materials; this would allow him to devote more time to religious instruction and language education.

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The key to culture

Haldeman-Julius, E. (Emanuel), 1888-1951

Book edited by Emmanuel Haldeman-Julius of Girard, Kansas, describing the cultural distinctiveness of Buddhism and Confusionism found in Indian and Chinese society. Due to copyright restrictions, only the cover of the book is available in Kansas Memory at this time.

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National Kansas Committee, request for clothing and provisions

National Kansas Committee

This advertisement was attached to a receipt for the placement of a notice in the New York Times. The advertisement included information about how the people of New England could aid the fight for freedom in Kansas--both with funds and with labor. It also gave the names of National Kansas Committee members and an address for their New York office.

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Ottawa Indian Mission balance sheet

Meeker, Jotham, 1804-1855

This balance sheet, prepared by Baptist missionary Jotham Meeker, outlines the income and expenses of the Ottawa mission during 1842. This mission was located near present-day Ottawa, Kansas. It includes information on expenditures for translations into native languages, native education, interpreters, and the printing office. These funds benefited the Ottawa, Potawatomi, Delaware, and Shawnee Indians residing in Indian Territory.

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Shawnee Sun (Siwinowe Kesibwi)

Lykins, Johnston, 1800?-1876

This photo static copy of the Shawnee Sun represents the first newspaper printed in Kansas (then known as Indian Territory). The paper was written in the Shawnee alphabet created by Johnston Lykins, a Baptist missionary to the Shawnee Indians. The newspaper lists John Gill Pratt as publisher. The original paper copy of this issue is held by the LaBudde Special Collections Department, Miller Nichols Library, University of Missouri-Kansas City.

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L. W. Halbe collection

Halbe, L. W. (Leslie Winfield), 1893-1981

The L. W. (Leslie Winfield) Halbe photo collection consists of 1500 glass plate negatives produced by Halbe during his teenage years. Halbe lived in Dorrance, Russell County, Kansas, and began taking photographs of the region with an inexpensive Sears and Roebuck camera when he was fifteen years old.

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