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Page 1 of 4, showing 10 records out of 39 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

John R. Brinkley to Wallace Davis

Brinkley, John Richard, 1885-1942

A letter written by Dr. John R. Brinkley to Wallace Davis, attorney. In this letter to his attorney, Brinkley outlines the difficulties he and Minnie Brinkley are experiencing. He discusses the razing of XERA radio station, bankruptcy, his declining health, and the federal indictment.

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John R. Brinkley to Minnie Brinkley

Brinkley, John Richard, 1885-1942

A letter written by Dr. John R. Brinkley to his wife Minnie Brinkley on Mother's Day. He asks her to remember the good times, care for their son, and never falter when faced with persecution and disappointment. This letter was written from San Antonio, Texas where he later died of heart failure on May 26, 1942.

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John R. Brinkley to Minnie Brinkley

Brinkley, John Richard, 1885-1942

A letter written by Dr. John R. Brinkley to Minnie Brinkley. It was written on stationery from the Hotel Bellerive in Kansas City, Missouri. In the letter, he writes about the razing of XERA radio tower and refers to it as "The Sunshine Station between the nations is gone". Also, Brinkley mentions KFKB his radio station in Milford, Kansas.

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William Allen White in Colorado

This is a photograph showing William Allen White in a rocking chair on the porch of his cabin in Colorado. White was the long time editor of the Emporia Gazette.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania of his journey to Kansas City to obtain a land warrant for Topeka and to attend the Free State Convention. Two of his articles had been published in The Herald of Freedom, a Lawrence newspaper, and he sent copies. Mentioning political difficulties, Holliday suggested that his wife wait until fall to travel to Kansas. He rented out his cabin in Topeka for profit. A deadly cholera epidemic at Fort Riley had ended.

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George Washington Brown to Eli Thayer

Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915

George Washington Brown, editor of the Herald of Freedom newspaper, was one of seven free state leaders arrested on May 14, 1856 on charges of high treason and held prisoner by federal troops near Lecompton. G. W. Brown described the sack of Lawrence and the destruction of his printing press, commented upon the harshness of his prison conditions, and asked Eli Thayer to do anything in his power to help secure his release.

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Dr. Karl and Dr. Roy Menninger on AM American television show

Stephanie Edwards interviewed Dr. Karl and Dr. Roy Menninger on the ABC morning show, AM America . Dr. C.F. Menninger and his sons, Dr. Karl and Dr. Will, founded the Menninger Clinic in Topeka, Kansas, for mental-health treatment, education, and research.

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CBS Merv Griffin Show with Dr. Roy Menninger and Dr. Harold Voth

This black and white photograph shows Dr. Roy Menninger, left, with Merv Griffin and Dr. Harold Voth at the filming of the CBS Merv Griffin Show.

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William C. Menninger, M.D.

California Academy of Sciences

Dr. William C. Menninger is being interviewed by Arthur Brown at KQED television station in San Francisco, California. "Dr. Will" and his father, Dr. C. F. Menninger and his brother "Dr. Karl" established the Menninger Clinic, originally in Topeka, Kansas, but now located in Houston, Texas. Dr. Will was instrumental in establishing the Menninger School of Psychiatry in Topeka to care for the veterans of WWII. He is known as one of the key influences in the development of a psychiatric guide which later became known as the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM).

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C. E. Blood to Hiram Hill

Blood, C.E.

C.E. Blood wrote from Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts. Blood told Hill that, by mistake, a house had been built on one of Hill's town lots. He offered to trade lots with Hill, maintaining that both were of equal quality and value, and told him that the house would serve as the printing office of a new newspaper, the Manhattan Statesman.

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