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Page 1 of 1, showing 8 records out of 8 total, starting on record 1, ending on 8

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Marvin and Irene Davis, Rossville, Kansas

Marvin and Irene Davis from Rossville, Kansas, are reading a 4-H Journal together on April 17, 1958. Marvin was born February 19, 1910, in Rossville. Irene was born Irene Lasswell on September 22, 1912, at St. Clere. They married May 17, 1936. They were both involved in 4-H. Marvin was a farmer and stockman. Irene was a Rossville U.S. Postal Service clerk. Marvin died on September 14, 1991, and Irene died on February 27, 1996, both in Rossville. This photograph is provided through a pilot project to host unique cultural heritage materials from local libraries on Kansas Memory and was accomplished by mutual agreement between the Northeast Kansas Library System, the Rossville Community Library, and the Kansas Historical Society.

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William Hutchinson

Clinedinst

A portrait of William Hutchinson, a journalist and correspondent for the New York Times, Chicago Tribune, St. Louis Democrat and Washington Republic, he covered events in Kansas from 1855 through the early 1860s. He settled in Lawrence, Kansas Territory. Hutchinson served as secretary of the Kansas Central Committee and assisted with efforts to send emigrant parties and relief to Kansas Territory. He was first identified with the abolition or free-soil party, until the Republican party organized. Hutchinson was a member of the Wyandotte Constitution Convention and was an early and persistent advocate of temperance and other reforms.

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William H. Russell

A formal portrait of William H. Russell, who was a proslavery supporter and businessman. In the winter of 1858-1859, Russell, with Alexander Majors, William Waddell, and John Jones, founded the Leavenworth and Pike's Peak Express Company, a freight and stage company that operated between Leavenworth and Denver, Colorado. In February, 1860, it was reorganized as the Central Overland California & Pike's Peak Express Company. In 1860, Russell, with partners Majors and Waddell, created the first Pony Express, which connected St. Joseph, Missouri, across 2,000 miles to the state of California.

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Scenes of Sherman County, Kansas

Multiple scenes of Sherman County, Kansas.

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Josiah Miller

Although born in South Carolina, Josiah Miller was a free state supporter. He attended college in Indiana and law school in New York. He came to Kansas in 1854 and on January 5, 1855, established the Kansas Free State newspaper in Lawrence. The newspaper office was destroyed by order of the territorial government on May 21, 1856 because is was deemed a nuisance. He was capturned by Buford's proslavery forces and was tried for treason against the state of South Carolina. He supported John C. Fremont. In 1857, he was elected probate judge of Douglas County, Kansas Territory.

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Horace Greeley

A photograph of Horace Greeley who was editor of the New York Tribune during the Kansas territorial era. He actively supported the free state cause in Kansas through editorials as well as coming to Kansas in 1859. He advocated resistance to the implementation of the Kansas-Nebraska Act and was involved in the founding of the Republican Party.

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L. W. Halbe collection

Halbe, L. W. (Leslie Winfield), 1893-1981

The L. W. (Leslie Winfield) Halbe photo collection consists of 1500 glass plate negatives produced by Halbe during his teenage years. Halbe lived in Dorrance, Russell County, Kansas, and began taking photographs of the region with an inexpensive Sears and Roebuck camera when he was fifteen years old.

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George Washington Martin

This photograph shows George Washington Martin holding a unidentified child. In 1857 Martin migrated from Pennsylvania to the Kansas Territory settling in Lecompton, where he secured a position with the pro-slavery paper the, ?Lecompton Union?, later becoming the ?National Democrat?. He relocated to Junction City, Kansas, establishing a career as a newspaper editor and publisher with the founding of the ?Junction City Union?. Actively involved in the community, Martin held several public offices from mayor of Junction City to serving in the Kansas House of Representatives. In 1888 he moved to Kansas City, Kansas establishing the ?Daily Gazette? newspaper. Martin was the managing editor of the newspaper until 1899 when he is elected secretary of the Kansas Historical Society. For fifteen years he collected and preserved Kansas history. Martin resigned from this position in February 1914 and was appointed secretary emeritus of the Kansas Historical Society. On March 27, 1914 Martin passed away in Topeka, Kansas.

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