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Page 1 of 222, showing 10 records out of 2217 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Governor Andrew Shoeppel doctor shortage correspondence

Kansas. Governor (1943-1947 : Schoeppel)

This correspondence between Governor Schoeppel and various individuals, including Senator Arthur Capper, addresses the serious shortage of medical doctors in Kansas in the later summer of 1945. Because of the urgent need for trained medical personnel during World War II, thousands of doctors either joined the military or worked in military-run facilities. As a result, many states found themselves lacking the medical personnel that they needed to take care of the civilians not directly involved in fighting the war.

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United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 7, Correspondence

United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Central Superintendency

Correspondence sent from the Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency in St. Louis, Missouri. The Superintendents of Indian Affairs during this period were Joshua Pilcher, David D. Mitchell, and Thomas H. Harvey. Their correspondence with Indian agents and sub-agencies concerned the disbursement of allotments and annuities, the settling of expenses and treaty stipulations, and the nominations of blacksmiths, interpreters, and farmers for several tribes. A searchable, full-text (PDF) transcription is available under "External Links" below.

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Lawson Wilson to Lewis Allen Alderson

These three letters are from Lawson Wilson in Lincoln County, North Carolina, to his friend, Lewis Allen Alderson, a student at the University of Ohio in Athens. In his letters, Wilson reminisces about time spent in Athens and seeks news about his old acquaintances. Wilson states that "Nullification has been making a great noise in the South," regarding the ability of individual states to abolish federal laws, particularly relating to tariffs and slave laws in South Carolina. He also mentions that the gold mines in the region are making "a great bustle" and congratulates Alderson on his recent marriage. Alderson moved to Atchison, Kansas, in 1858 and was a prominent Baptist minister. He died in Atchison in 1881.

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Dorothea Dix correspondence

Dix, Dorothea Lynde, 1802-1887

Dorothea Dix's papers consist of correspondence from Miss Dix to various people, as well as some correspondence in which Miss Dix was concerned, but not directly involved. Dix was an advocate for social welfare, particularly supporting the establishment and maintenance of mental hospitals for the mentally ill, disabled, or poor. She was instrumental in the proposed legislation of the "Bill for the Benefit of the Indigent Insane." During the Civil War, Dix was appointed Superintendent of Army Nurses. Much of the correspondence concerns Dix's efforts to bring lifeboats and other help to Sable Island in Nova Scotia, an area known for shipwrecks and where many with mental illnesses were sent, sometimes against their will. These papers are part of the historic psychiatry material in the Menninger Archives.

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Frank's Pharmacy, Valley Falls, Kansas

A photograph of John Carlin, former Governor of Kansas, and Frank Shrimplin, inside Frank's Pharmacy standing in front of a "History of Pharmacy" display. Frank Shrimplin owned the pharmacy at 324 Broadway. The photograph is signed by John Carlin.

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United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 24, Accounts

United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Central Superintendency

This volume contains the accounts of Thomas Forsyth (1822-1830), Felix St. Vrain (1830-1831), Joshua Pilcher (1832), and M.S. Davenport (1832-1834), Indian agents for the Sac and Fox at the Rock Island, Illinois sub-agency. During this time, the accounts were recorded by William Clark (of the Lewis and Clark Expedition) who was the Superintendent of Indian Affairs at the Central Superintendency in St. Louis, Missouri. Some of the expenditures included salaries for interpreters, blacksmiths, and agents, transportation costs, blankets, tobacco, whiskey, flour, and salt. Partial funding for the digitization of these records was provided by the National Park Service.

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Fern Gayden

This is a photograph of Fern Gayden possibly taken in Dunlap, Kansas. Fern Gayden was born September 29, 1904, in Dunlap, Kansas, where she attended elementary and secondary schools. She went on to attend Kansas State Teachers College at Emporia and taught school for one year. Fern Gayden moved to Chicago at the age of 23. She had a 50-year career as a social worker but became best known as a literary, fine arts, and political activist. A founding member of the South Side Writers Group in the 1930s, Fern Gayden's long and diverse career included leadership roles in the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom and the South Side Community Art Center. During World War II, she co-published Negro Story magazine with Alice Browning.

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Lone Pine

Coy Avon Seward

Black and white intaglio print on paper, depicting a single pine tree in a rocky terrain. The artist was Coy Avon Seward (1884-1939), born in Chase, Kansas, and trained at both Washburn and Bethany colleges. Seward was a founding member of the Prairie Print Makers Association. This group believed art should be affordable for all people. Seward inscribed this print to the donor, Virginia McArthur of Hutchinson, who saw Seward produce the print in 1934.

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United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 25, Accounts

United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Central Superintendency

This volume contains records of current accounts for Osage Indian agents, including Alexander McNair, John F. Hamtramck and Paul L. Chouteau. William Clark (of the Lewis and Clark Expedition) served as Superintendent of Indian Affairs for the Central Superintendency in St. Louis, Missouri. Records were kept for the salaries of the agents, interpreters, and blacksmiths, transportation costs, presents, provisions, and paid annuities. Partial funding for the digitization of these records was provided by the National Park Service.

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Joan of Arc of the coal fields, near Pittsburg, Kansas

New York Times

This newspaper clipping, from the New York Times, features a fourteen year old girl dubbed "The Joan of Arc of the Coal Fields." The daughter of a coal striker in southeast Kansas, she carried the American flag at the head of 6,000 marchers. The group of protesters marched through the coal fields showing their support for better wages and improved working conditions for their family members who worked in the camps.

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