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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 18 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Nancy Landon Kassebaum

United States Senate

A photograph of Nancy Landon Kassebaum, United States Senator from Kansas, placing an ornament on a Christmas tree.

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David J. Brewer and C. B. Brace to William Kincaid

Brewer, David J. (David Josiah), 1837-1910

A letter written by David J. Brewer and C. B. Brace, Leavenworth, Kansas, to Reverend William Kincaid, minister of the Congregational Church in Rushville, New York, encouraging him to become the minister of the First Congregational Church in Leavenworth, Kansas. The letter describes the church and invites Rev. Kincaid to spend time with the congregation. He accepted the position and served from the fall of 1870 through January, 1876. Brewer was a lawyer. During his distinguished legal career, he was a Kansas Supreme Court Justice,1871 - 1884, United States Circuit Court Justice, 1884 - 1889, and United States Supreme Court Justice, 1889 - 1910.

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Johnston Lykins

Johnston Lykins was a well-known missionary, physician, and translator who worked with the Pottawatomi and Shawnee Indians who had moved to Indian Territory (present-day Kansas) after the passage of the Indian Removal Act in 1830. In 1831, after serving as a missionary to the Indian tribes in Indiana and Michigan, Lykins and his first wife Delilah (McCoy) Lykins moved to Indian Territory. Lykins and his father-in-law, Isaac McCoy, established the Shawnee Indian Baptist Mission in present-day Johnson County, Kansas. In addition to his responsibilities as a physician, Lykins worked as a translator and developed a system of Indian orthography that allowed the Shawnee people to read and write in their native language. He edited and published the first paper printed in Shawnee, called the Sinwiowe Kesibwi (Shawnee Sun). In the spring of 1843, Lykins founded a mission among the Pottawatomi near what is today Topeka. Due, perhaps, to inter-denominational conflicts and other problems with the mission, Lykins left the Pottawatomi mission and moved to Kansas City, Missouri. He served as the second mayor of Kansas City in 1854, and he remained in residence there until his death in 1876.

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John W. Robinson to Hiram Hill

Robinson, John W

John Robinson, President and Agent of the Manhattan Town Association, wrote from Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts. Robinson responded to Hill's interest in investing in the town, describing the town's current situation, climate, and development rate. He provided specific and dramatic examples of increasing property values, and assured Hill that there would be no land speculation; he would only sell lots to those investors who were willing to build.

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Rachel Garrison to Samuel Adair

Garrison, Rachel A.

Rachel Garrison wrote to her cousin, Samuel Adair, that she had a little daughter two months old, which meant she was pregnant when her husband, David Garrison, was killed in the Battle of Osawatomie in August, 1856, and when she returned to Yellow Springs, Ohio. She also mentioned her other daughter, Jania. She hoped Adair could hold on to the claim the Garrisons pre-empted until it could be entered at the land office. She also listed items she would like Adair to sell for her. The same letter also contained correspondence from James Garrison.

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Ephraim Nute to Edward Everett Hale

Nute, Ephraim

Rev. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Nute inquired about the possibility of Hale arranging a loan of $2000 at reasonable interest for the completion of the Unitarian Church in Lawrence. He reported on the high rates of interest being charged for loans in Kansas Territory and on the general effects of the panic of 1857 on the territorial economy. Nute also expressed his dissatisfaction with the Buchanan administration's handling of the Lecompton Constitution and his hope that a change in presidential administration in 1860 would result in Kansas' admission as a free state.

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Samuel Lyle Adair to John Brown

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

Samuel Adair wrote his brother-in-law John Brown from Osawatomie on October 2, 1857, to explain why he could not come see Brown in Iowa. Much of letter describes the general poor state of health in his locale, but he also comments on the political and especially the prospects for free state success in the upcoming election--Adair was not optimistic.

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Samuel Newell Simpson to Hiram Hill

Simpson, Samuel Newell

Samuel Simpson wrote to Hiram Hill from Boston, Massachusetts, requesting that Hill send the $500 he pledged to invest in a church in Kansas Territory. Simpson indicated that he needed to quickly raise $5-8,000, and could not return to the Territory without it.

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Gottlieb F. Oehler to Eli K. Price

Oehler, Gottlieb

Gottlieb F. Oehler, a Moravian missionary working with the Chippewa and Munsee Indians in Kansas Territory, wrote this letter to Eli Price regarding the mistreatment of Indians and whites? disrespectful attitudes toward Indian lands. Oehler was appalled that white squatters frequently settled on Indian land with no response from the federal government, who should have protected Indian land claims. While most white Americans agreed with the government?s approach to removal, Oehler hoped that Price would speak out against federal policies and educate the public in the eastern United States about the treatment of Indians out west.

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Reverend Charles Bluejacket

Charles Bluejacket, a mixed-blood Shawnee Indian, came to Kansas (then called Indian Territory) in 1832. He was a well-respected man among the Shawnee Indians, and he became an ordained Methodist minister in 1859. He moved to new Indian territory in Oklahoma in 1871. This photograph, which depicts Bluejacket in his late thirties or forties, was most likely taken in the 1860s or 1870s.

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