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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 17 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Charles Robinson to Edward Everett Hale

Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894

Charles Robinson wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Robinson complained about the lack of respect he had received from New England Emigrant Aid Company leaders. He was particularly upset about criticisms of his financial ability. Robinson expressed anger at what he perceived as Eli Thayer's and the New England Emigrant Aid Company's opposition to the development of the town of Quindaro. Robinson included excerpts from a letter he received from James Redpath outlining Thayer's criticisms of Robinson's involvement with Quindaro.

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Orville Chester Brown to Mr. Ward

Brown, Orville Chester, 1811-1904

This letter, written by Orville C. Brown from Osawatomie, was addressed to Mr. Ward. For the most part, it related information about the development of Osawatomie and various land claims, including a discussion about the boundaries of the town.

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William Brown, deed

Trustees of the Town of Osawatomie: Samuel C. Pomeroy, et. al.,

This deed granted William Brown of Otego, New York a town lot in Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. Written over the deed certificate is a note from O. C. Brown, clerk of the Board of Trustees, which declares that this lot had been transferred to Mr. Jabez Holmes. On the back of the deed there is a written statement in which William Brown transfers ownership to Mr. Holmes, dated September 24, 1858.

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Oscar Dayton to Orville Chester Brown

Dayton, Oscar V

This letter, written by Oscar Dayton from the Banking Office of Dayton and Co., Mt. Pleasant, Iowa, was addressed to Orville C. Brown, a founder of Osawatomie. The main subject of the letter was a printing press and other pertinent materials that were available to the residents of Osawatomie, if they in turn paid Dayton's debts and granted him deeds for town lots in Osawatomie. That was Dayton's preferred method of payment. Furthermore, Dayton informed Brown that there were other men who were interested in purchasing the printing press, so he needed a speedy reply to this letter. It concluded with personal regards to Mr. Brown's family.

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Osawatomie Town Company, Share Certificate

This blank share in the Osawatomie Town Company was signed by the secretary and by O. C. Brown, President. The document states that the town was chartered in January 1858, and on the side is a note declaring that Osawatomie was burned in 1856 and rebuilt in 1857.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. This letter was to be delivered by Mr. Ingrams, and Holliday expressed the possibilities of following shortly or of staying in Lawrence to make business arrangements and put up a building in the spring. He expressed his delight in the country of Kansas and the site of a new city (not named, but likely Topeka). A Pennsylvania company of emigrants, unprepared for the journey and now suffering, had settled in Lawrence and Council Grove.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday, the founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. He told her of his planned trip up the Kansas River, his pleasure in the people of Kansas Territory, and a Thanksgiving dinner he attended. Unwilling to return to Pennsylvania, Holliday expressed desire that Mary come to Kansas Territory and described the construction of a friend's sod-covered "mansion," one such as Clarina I. H. Nichols, a lecturer and writer, inhabited.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday, founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory, wrote from "Up the River," Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania, describing the difficult living conditions for him and the other men at the future site of Topeka, where they had been visited by Governor Andrew H. Reeder. Holliday assured his wife of his health and requested that she explain to Mr. Drew Lowry and Mr. McFarland in Pennsylvania why he had not written. He praised the beauty of the country and expressed his vision of its future, ending with a request that she write to him.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday, the founder of Topeka, wrote from Topeka, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania, mentioning difficulties but emphasizing his love for her and his desire that they be reunited soon. He compared the local landscape to the Italian countryside. Uncertain as to the time of his return, he wrote that he must stay to oversee business.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday, founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. After three weeks at the future site of Topeka, Holliday was glad for city comforts. He mentioned the site's beauty, the prospect of building a house on his farm claim, and his personal success since leaving Meadville. On December 18, 1854, he had been unanimously elected President of the Topeka Town Association and appointed temporary agent of the New England Emigrant Aid Company. The bottom two-thirds of page 3 and 4 (which contained Holliday's signature) have been cut and removed.

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