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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 18 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Jonathan Crews to Thomas Nesbit Stinson

Crews, Jonathan

Jonathan Crews, writing from LaPorte, Indiana, expressed strong proslavery views on the situation in Kansas. Crews described his trip home to Indiana from Kansas and discussed several Indiana court cases involving his business interests.

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Robert T. Stephan with President Ronald Reagan

This is a photograph of Robert T. Stephan shaking hands with President Ronald Reagan. After graduating from Washburn University's law school, Robert T. Stephan practiced law in Wichita, Kansas. From 1965 to 1978, he was a district court judge in Wichita, Kansas. In 1979, he was elected Kansas Attorney General and he served in that office for 16 years. He helped craft and eventually win passage of the 1992 Victims' Rights Amendment. The legislation established a compensation fund, crime victims' board, community grants, and revised sentencing guidelines in Kansas. After leaving office, he moved to Lenexa, Kansas, and worked as a corporate legal consultant, dealing principally in consumer protection matters and federal trade commission rules in regard to marketing. Stephan has received many awards for his service to the state and community.

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Robert T. Stephan with President Bill Clinton

This is a photograph of Kansas Attorney General Robert T. Stephan shaking hands with United States President Bill Clinton. After graduating from Washburn University's law school, Robert T. Stephan practiced law in Wichita, Kansas. From 1965 to 1978, he was a district court judge in Wichita, Kansas. In 1979, he was elected Kansas Attorney General and he served in that office for 16 years. He helped craft and eventually win passage of the 1992 Victims' Rights Amendment. The legislation established a compensation fund, crime victims' board, community grants, and revised sentencing guidelines in Kansas. After leaving office, he moved to Lenexa, Kansas, and worked as a corporate legal consultant, dealing principally in consumer protection matters and federal trade commission rules in regard to marketing. Stephan has received many awards for his service to the state and community.

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Robert T. Stephan with President George H. W. Bush

This is a photograph of Kansas Attorney General Robert T. Stephan shaking hands with United States President George H. W. Bush. After graduating from Washburn University's law school, Robert T. Stephan practiced law in Wichita, Kansas. From 1965 to 1978, he was a district court judge in Wichita, Kansas. In 1979, he was elected Kansas Attorney General and he served in that office for 16 years. He helped craft and eventually win passage of the 1992 Victims' Rights Amendment. The legislation established a compensation fund, crime victims' board, community grants, and revised sentencing guidelines in Kansas. After leaving office, he moved to Lenexa, Kansas, and worked as a corporate legal consultant, dealing principally in consumer protection matters and federal trade commission rules in regard to marketing. Stephan has received many awards for his service to the state and community.

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Walter Augustus Huxman

This black and white photograph shows governors gathered for a celebration in Amarillo, Texas. In the middle is Jas V. Allred of Texas with Erest W. Marland of Oklahom and Teller Ammons of Colorado to his left; and Clyde Tingley of New Mexico and Walter Huxman of Kansas on the right.

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Wilson Shannon to John A. Halderman

Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877

Wilson Shannon was an Ohio Democrat who preceded John W. Geary as governor of Kansas Territory (August 1856--August 1857) and was considered a proslave partisan. Shanon writes John Halderman from Lecompton, Kansas Territory, regarding some legal matters--specifically, "some land warrants" being sent to Halderman in Leavenworth. Attorney John Halderman was trusted and respected by men on both the anti- and pro-slavery sides.

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Testimony of A. A. Harris, in report and testimony of the select committee to investigate the causes of the removal of the Negroes from the southern states to the northern states, in three parts

United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee on Negro Exodus

A. A. Harris, a white resident of Ft. Scott, Kansas, gave this brief testimony on March 29, 1880, before the Senate select committee investigating the causes of the Exodus. Harris described his contact with the black Exodusters in his area, including their difficulty finding employment. The committee also asked Harris to speak in some detail about the general treatment of African-Americans in Kansas, including any discrimination against them, particularly in the world of politics. This committee was composed of three Democratic senators and two Republican senators: Daniel W. Voorhees (Dem., Indiana), Zebulon B. Vance (Dem., North Carolina), George H. Pendleton (Dem., Ohio), William Windom (Rep., Minnesota), and Henry W. Blair (Rep., New Hampshire). Senators Blair and Vance asked the questions presented in this testimony.

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John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

Much of this interesting letter, dated November 21, 1858, from Sumner, Kansas Territory, describes the Ingalls law practice and the nature of a "frontier" court proceedings that often attracted "nearly all the population." According to Ingalls, "the chief difficulty arising [in the courts came] from the conflict of the two Codes, adopted by two hostile legislatures, each of which had adherents who call the other 'bogus.'" Ingalls also discussed the business of land sales, as something many others successfully combined with the practice of law.

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Thomas Ewing, Jr., to Thomas Ewing, Sr.

Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896

Thomas Ewing, Jr., wrote from Leavenworth to his father in Ohio seeking his assistance with a legal matter involving claims to the land "reserved to certain half breeds of the Kansas tribe." Most of this land was occupied by squatters and questions of legal title and transfer were being litigated in the territorial and federal courts.

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Abraham Lincoln

A portrait of Abraham Lincoln. In December 1859, Lincoln traveled to the Kansas Territory and spoke at Elwood, Troy, Doniphan, Atchison, and Leavenworth. His speeches covered several issues including preventing the expansion of slavery, the theory of popular sovereignty, and the evils of states seceding from the Union. In 1860, Lincoln received the Republican party's nomination for president. Although Kansans liked him the delegation from the territory did not support his nomination. He won the election, and on February 22, 1861, at Independence Hall, Philadelphia, PA, Lincoln raised the United States flag bearing a 34th star, honoring Kansas as the newest state.

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