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Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions -- Lawyers (Remove)
Date -- 1880s (Remove)
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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Testimony of A. A. Harris, in report and testimony of the select committee to investigate the causes of the removal of the Negroes from the southern states to the northern states, in three parts

United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee on Negro Exodus

A. A. Harris, a white resident of Ft. Scott, Kansas, gave this brief testimony on March 29, 1880, before the Senate select committee investigating the causes of the Exodus. Harris described his contact with the black Exodusters in his area, including their difficulty finding employment. The committee also asked Harris to speak in some detail about the general treatment of African-Americans in Kansas, including any discrimination against them, particularly in the world of politics. This committee was composed of three Democratic senators and two Republican senators: Daniel W. Voorhees (Dem., Indiana), Zebulon B. Vance (Dem., North Carolina), George H. Pendleton (Dem., Ohio), William Windom (Rep., Minnesota), and Henry W. Blair (Rep., New Hampshire). Senators Blair and Vance asked the questions presented in this testimony.

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Albert Howell Horton

In 1874 Albert Howell Horton was elected to a term in the Kansas House of Representatives and in 1876 was elected to a term in the Kansas Senate. In 1876 he was appointed chief justice of the Supreme Court.

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Eugene Ware correspondence

This is a series of correspondence to and from Eugene Fitch Ware (1841-1911). Ware moved to Fort Scott, Kansas, after the Civil War and became employed at the Fort Scott Monitor. In 1879, Ware began the first of three terms in the Kansas State Senate. During his terms of office, Ware introduced bills concerning railroads, life insurance, militia, and relief and support of the poor as well as bills of a more local nature. Ware moved to Topeka in 1893 to become a partner with Charles Gleed and his brother, James, forming the law firm of Gleed, Ware and Gleed. In addition to journalism, law, and politics, Ware used the pseudonym, Ironquill, for his literary and poetic achievements. His works include "Neutralia" and "The Rhymes of Ironquill". For a complete contents list of the papers of Eugene Fitch Ware, see the External Links below.

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George W. Espey to Governor John A. Martin

George W. Espey, an agent of the Palace Drug Store in Ashland, Kansas, writes to Governor John A. Martin in Topeka asking whether he must quit selling alcohol because the county clerk does not have the proper affidavit form for him to fill out to renew his license. Espey asks for a prompt reply because the county attorney has stopped him from doing business.

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Albert Howell Horton & wife

In 1874, Albert Horton was elected to a term in the Kansas House of Representatives and in 1876 was elected to a term in the Kansas Senate. In 1876 he was appointed chief justice of the Supreme Court.

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Members of the Topeka Kansas Bar Association

This black and white photograph shows a panel with members of the Topeka Kansas Bar Association. On the first row, in the middle, is an image of a young Charles Curtis.

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John Lewis Waller

Martin, H. T.

This sepia colored cabinet card shows John Lewis Waller, 1850-1907. Born into slavery, Waller overcame his humble beginnings to become an accomplished lawyer, journalist, politician and diplomat. He migrated to Kansas in the spring of 1878, after hearing of Pap Singleton's efforts to colonize Blacks in the state.

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DeWitt Clinton Nellis

A photograph of DeWitt Clinton Nellis, lawyer and judge. Nellis came to Topeka, Kansas in 1871 where he taught school and studied law. He was admitted to the bar on February 21, 1873 and worked in the law office of Martin, Burns & Case. In 1873, he was appointed county attorney of Ellis County, Kansas and served four successive terms. On March 15, 1881, Nellis was appointed judge of the 17th Judicial District of Kansas by Governor John P. St. John. Nellis was a candidate for Kansas Attorney General but was defeated at the 1884 Republican convention in Topeka. In June 1885, he moved to Topeka and practiced law. Nellis developed hearing problems and retired from active practice in 1887. After leaving his law practice, he became secretary of the Kansas Farmer Company.

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William Eugene Stanley

This black and white photograph shows William Eugene Stanley, (1844-1910). Stanley, a native of Ohio, settled in Jefferson County, Kansas in 1870 to practice law. He entered public service, in 1871, by serving as the Jefferson County attorney, (1871-1872). A few years later he became the Sedgwick County attorney, (1874 to 1880). In 1880, he made a political bid for a seat in the Kansas House of Representatives and served one term as a Republican from the ninety-second district, (1881-1883). Stanley resumed his political career in 1898, when he was elected the fifteenth governor of Kansas. He was also re-elected in 1901 to a second term. Stanley left office on January 12, 1903 to return to private life in Wichita, Kansas and to practice law. On October 13, 1919, William Eugene Stanley died at the age of 66. He was buried at the Highland Cemetery in Wichita, Kansas.

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William Eugene Stanley

This black and white photograph shows William Eugene Stanley, (1844-1910). Stanley, a native of Ohio, settled in Jefferson County, Kansas, in 1870 to practice law. He entered public service, in 1871, by serving as the Jefferson County attorney, (1871-1872). A few years later he became the Sedgwick County attorney, (1874-1880). In 1880, he made a political bid for a seat in the Kansas House of Representatives and served one term as a Republican from the ninety-second district, (1881-1883). Stanley resumed his political career in 1898, when he was elected the fifteenth governor of Kansas. He was also re-elected in 1901 to a second term. During his administration, the Kansas supreme court was increased to seven justices and funds were appropriated to finish the construction on the statehouse. Stanley left office on January 12, 1903 to return to private life in Wichita, Kansas, and to practice law. On October 13, 1910, William Eugene Stanley passed away at the age of sixty-six. He was later buried at the Highland Cemetery in Wichita, Kansas.

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