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Page 1 of 10, showing 10 records out of 93 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Lawson Wilson to Lewis Allen Alderson

These three letters are from Lawson Wilson in Lincoln County, North Carolina, to his friend, Lewis Allen Alderson, a student at the University of Ohio in Athens. In his letters, Wilson reminisces about time spent in Athens and seeks news about his old acquaintances. Wilson states that "Nullification has been making a great noise in the South," regarding the ability of individual states to abolish federal laws, particularly relating to tariffs and slave laws in South Carolina. He also mentions that the gold mines in the region are making "a great bustle" and congratulates Alderson on his recent marriage. Alderson moved to Atchison, Kansas, in 1858 and was a prominent Baptist minister. He died in Atchison in 1881.

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Samuel L. Adair's sermon records, 1855-1860

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

This is a record of sermons given by Samuel L. Adair. The information includes the biblical text, the date, the place where the sermon was given, and the subject (including funeral sermons) for sermons delivered between 1855 and 1860. Later entries also include brief remarks. Many of the sermons were given in homes, so these locations provide some idea of the neighborhood. This item is a subset (pages 25-53) of Adair's full sermon records.

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Charles Monroe Sheldon

Charles Monroe Sheldon, pastor of Central Congregational Church in Topeka, Kansas, organized the first Black kindergarten west of the Mississippi River. It was known as the Tennesseetown Kindergarten. He is best known for his novel "In His Steps" or "What Would Jesus Do?"

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W.H. Makeaney to Governor John St. John

Makeaney, W.H.

Kansas Governor St. John is invited to speak on temperance at a camp meeting in August near Melvern, Kansas. Pastor Makeaney, writing from Quenemo, Osage County, Kansas, would prefer a Sunday speech, taking advantage of the maximum attendance that day. MaKeaney is a Methodist minister.

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Charles Monroe Sheldon

Samarjian's Studio

This is a photograph of Rev. Charles Monroe Sheldon, pastor of Central Congregational Church in Topeka, Kansas. He organized the Tennessee Town Kindergarten, which is the first black kindergarten west of the Mississippi River. Rev. Sheldon is best known for his novel "In His Steps" or "What Would Jesus Do?"

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Tea service

This silver tea set was given to Reverend Joseph E. and Nancy Jane (McPherson) Hopkins for their 25th wedding anniversary in 1903. The couple moved to Kansas from Illinois in the late 1870s. Their religious service took them to a number of churches around the state. In 1903, they served at the Methodist Church in Sedan where church members presented them with this tea service for their silver wedding anniversary. The set was put to good use the following year when the Hopkins hosted temperance advocate Carry A. Nation for lunch at their home.

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John H. Linn to Lewis Allen Alderson

Three letters from John H. Linn to Lewis Allen Alderson. Alderson later moved to Atchison, Kansas, in 1858 and was a prominent Baptist minister. He died in Atchison in 1881.

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Clergyman's pocket diary and visiting book belonging to Boston Corbett

Pocket diary belonging to Thomas P. "Boston" Corbett, the man who killed John Wilkes Booth following President Lincoln's assassination. Before moving to Cloud County, Kansas in 1878, Corbett was pastor of the Siloam (Methodist) Mission Church located at 328 Pine Street in Camden, New Jersey. The book contains a list of members, records of funerals and baptisms, and diary entries.

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Johnston Lykins

Johnston Lykins was a well-known missionary, physician, and translator who worked with the Pottawatomi and Shawnee Indians who had moved to Indian Territory (present-day Kansas) after the passage of the Indian Removal Act in 1830. In 1831, after serving as a missionary to the Indian tribes in Indiana and Michigan, Lykins and his first wife Delilah (McCoy) Lykins moved to Indian Territory. Lykins and his father-in-law, Isaac McCoy, established the Shawnee Indian Baptist Mission in present-day Johnson County, Kansas. In addition to his responsibilities as a physician, Lykins worked as a translator and developed a system of Indian orthography that allowed the Shawnee people to read and write in their native language. He edited and published the first paper printed in Shawnee, called the Sinwiowe Kesibwi (Shawnee Sun). In the spring of 1843, Lykins founded a mission among the Pottawatomi near what is today Topeka. Due, perhaps, to inter-denominational conflicts and other problems with the mission, Lykins left the Pottawatomi mission and moved to Kansas City, Missouri. He served as the second mayor of Kansas City in 1854, and he remained in residence there until his death in 1876.

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Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance Union general correspondence

This is correspondence sent and received by Mary Evelyn Dobbs, corresponding secretary of the Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance Union from 1907 to 1939. The letters arrived from people across the state, including the presidents of county chapters of the KWCTU. Most correspondence relates to planned public speeches and visits intended to establish and support new branches of the KWCTU. There are also communications from the state organization to local units. Specific items include a letter dated July 1, 1918, from Dobbs to F.L. Pinet with a manuscript entitled "Early Factors in Kansas Prohibition" intended for publication in the Kansas Teacher, advertising contracts for the KWCTU periodical Our Messenger, and a letter written to Dobbs from Clara E. Keys, a WCTU missionary in Africa. One letter recognizes Mary Sibbitt as the organizer of comfort kits provided for soldiers at Fort Leavenworth. Sibbitt, known as the "Kansas Cyclone," was an founding officer of the International Association of Women Ministers. There are several other groups of official Kansas WCTU records on Kansas Memory. They can be found by selecting Collections - Manuscript - KWCTU/Mary Evelyn Dobbs.

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