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Page 1 of 21, showing 10 records out of 203 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Lawson Wilson to Lewis Allen Alderson

These three letters are from Lawson Wilson in Lincoln County, North Carolina, to his friend, Lewis Allen Alderson, a student at the University of Ohio in Athens. In his letters, Wilson reminisces about time spent in Athens and seeks news about his old acquaintances. Wilson states that "Nullification has been making a great noise in the South," regarding the ability of individual states to abolish federal laws, particularly relating to tariffs and slave laws in South Carolina. He also mentions that the gold mines in the region are making "a great bustle" and congratulates Alderson on his recent marriage. Alderson moved to Atchison, Kansas, in 1858 and was a prominent Baptist minister. He died in Atchison in 1881.

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C. G. Taylor to Lewis Allen Alderson

These two letters were written to Lewis Allen Alderson by his friend C. G. Taylor. In one of the letters, Taylor addresses Alderson's sister, Belinda C. Miles. Alderson later moved to Atchison, Kansas, in 1858 and was a prominent Baptist minister. He died in Atchison in 1881.

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Charles Arbuckle to Lewis Allen Alderson

These four letters are from Charles Arbuckle to Lewis Allen Alderson. Arbuckle writes from Alderson's hometown of Lewisburg, West Virginia. In the letters, Arbuckle encourages Alderson to propose to Miss Lucy B. Miles, whom Alderson marries the day after he graduates from the University of Ohio in 1832. Arbuckle states that "an amiable woman next to religion is man's greatest consolation" but he seeks to remain a bachelor himself. Arbuckle also attended the Staunton Convention leading up to the election of 1832. Alderson later moved to Atchison, Kansas, in 1858 and was a prominent Baptist minister. He died in Atchison in 1881.

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Samuel L. Adair's sermon records, 1855-1860

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

This is a record of sermons given by Samuel L. Adair. The information includes the biblical text, the date, the place where the sermon was given, and the subject (including funeral sermons) for sermons delivered between 1855 and 1860. Later entries also include brief remarks. Many of the sermons were given in homes, so these locations provide some idea of the neighborhood. This item is a subset (pages 25-53) of Adair's full sermon records.

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Jerome Causin Berryman

Strauss, J. C.

A photograph of Reverend Jerome Causin Berryman who was born in 1810 in Kentucky. He came to Kansas in 1833 to establish the Kickapoo Indian Mission near Leavenworth. In 1841, he became superintendent of the manual labor school at the Shawnee Methodist Mission. He later moved to Missouri and established a high school in Arcadia. Berryman died on May 8, 1906, at Caledonia, Missouri.

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Dr Haines? Golden Treatment

Golden Specific Company

Yellow cardboard package labeled ?Dr. Haines Golden Treatment for the Liquor Habit.? James Wilkins Haines was a Quaker minister, homeopathic physician, and alleged practitioner of quack medicine. Operating in Cincinnati, Ohio, in the late 19th century, Haines promoted a popular false theory that ingesting bichloride of gold cured alcoholism. Advertised as the Golden Treatment, the tablets contained benign substances and trace amounts of ipecac. Medicinal cures for alcoholism were popular during the Temperance movement.

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Charles Monroe Sheldon

Charles Monroe Sheldon, pastor of Central Congregational Church in Topeka, Kansas, organized the first Black kindergarten west of the Mississippi River. It was known as the Tennesseetown Kindergarten. He is best known for his novel "In His Steps" or "What Would Jesus Do?"

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First Thanksgiving Sermon

McVicar, Peter, 1829-1903

This sermon by Rev. Peter McVicar's sermons is entitled "First Thanksgiving Sermon." It was delivered in Topeka on November 29, 1860, just weeks after he assumed the pastorate of the Congregational Church. McVicar focused on the concept that God's blessings were not to be measured by the accumulation of money or property, making specific comments about Kansas. He suggested, for example, that citizens of Kansas Territory who gathered together on that day should be especially thankful for the hardships endured by "early" settlers in order to establish freedom from slavery.

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W.H. Makeaney to Governor John St. John

Makeaney, W.H.

Kansas Governor St. John is invited to speak on temperance at a camp meeting in August near Melvern, Kansas. Pastor Makeaney, writing from Quenemo, Osage County, Kansas, would prefer a Sunday speech, taking advantage of the maximum attendance that day. MaKeaney is a Methodist minister.

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Charles Monroe Sheldon

Samarjian's Studio

This is a photograph of Rev. Charles Monroe Sheldon, pastor of Central Congregational Church in Topeka, Kansas. He organized the Tennessee Town Kindergarten, which is the first black kindergarten west of the Mississippi River. Rev. Sheldon is best known for his novel "In His Steps" or "What Would Jesus Do?"

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