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Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 28 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Governor Andrew Shoeppel doctor shortage correspondence

Kansas. Governor (1943-1947 : Schoeppel)

This correspondence between Governor Schoeppel and various individuals, including Senator Arthur Capper, addresses the serious shortage of medical doctors in Kansas in the later summer of 1945. Because of the urgent need for trained medical personnel during World War II, thousands of doctors either joined the military or worked in military-run facilities. As a result, many states found themselves lacking the medical personnel that they needed to take care of the civilians not directly involved in fighting the war.

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Dr Haines? Golden Treatment

Golden Specific Company

Yellow cardboard package labeled ?Dr. Haines Golden Treatment for the Liquor Habit.? James Wilkins Haines was a Quaker minister, homeopathic physician, and alleged practitioner of quack medicine. Operating in Cincinnati, Ohio, in the late 19th century, Haines promoted a popular false theory that ingesting bichloride of gold cured alcoholism. Advertised as the Golden Treatment, the tablets contained benign substances and trace amounts of ipecac. Medicinal cures for alcoholism were popular during the Temperance movement.

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Circular letter no.1 from the Kansas State Board of Health

This letter explains the duty of the health officers and physicians of the state to report deaths to the State Board of Health or be fined $10.

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Johnston Lykins

Johnston Lykins was a well-known missionary, physician, and translator who worked with the Pottawatomi and Shawnee Indians who had moved to Indian Territory (present-day Kansas) after the passage of the Indian Removal Act in 1830. In 1831, after serving as a missionary to the Indian tribes in Indiana and Michigan, Lykins and his first wife Delilah (McCoy) Lykins moved to Indian Territory. Lykins and his father-in-law, Isaac McCoy, established the Shawnee Indian Baptist Mission in present-day Johnson County, Kansas. In addition to his responsibilities as a physician, Lykins worked as a translator and developed a system of Indian orthography that allowed the Shawnee people to read and write in their native language. He edited and published the first paper printed in Shawnee, called the Sinwiowe Kesibwi (Shawnee Sun). In the spring of 1843, Lykins founded a mission among the Pottawatomi near what is today Topeka. Due, perhaps, to inter-denominational conflicts and other problems with the mission, Lykins left the Pottawatomi mission and moved to Kansas City, Missouri. He served as the second mayor of Kansas City in 1854, and he remained in residence there until his death in 1876.

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Historic Psychiatry original miscellaneous documents

These are a variety of handwritten and typed letters, lectures, autographs, news clippings, biographical information, images and sketches, court documents, and other documents related to the history of psychiatry. These documents are housed in four boxes and the folders within are arranged alphabetically by surname or title, and they are included in the larger collection of historic psychiatry material in the Menninger Archives. Authors come from such fields as medicine, religion, prison and other reform and advocacy movements, politics, the military, etc. The documents themselves sometimes provide significant information, and sometimes they were collected because their authors were significant historical figures. Some of the individuals found in Box 1 include James Mark Baldwin, Ludwig Binswanger, Eugen Bleuler, Jean-Martin Charcot, Elizabeth Fry, Oliver Wendell Holmes, and Carl Jung. Some of the individuals found in Box 2 include Alfred Adler, Robert Frost, and Washinton Irving. This box also includes a 68-page handwritten notebook by Dr. W.W. Reed entitled "Reminiscenses About the Treatment of the Insane." Some of the individuals found in Box 3 include Amariah Brigham and Frederick van Eeden. This box also includes a correspondence file (1883-1888) on Ellen Kehoe, a patient at the Worcester Lunatic Hospital in Massachusetts, and a series of drawings from the 1920s and 1930s by a Belgian patient suffering from paranoia named Andreas at the Kankakee State Hospital in Illinois. The drawings were donated by Dr. J.B. Gier, formerly of the Topeka Veteran's Administration Hospital, who knew the patient and encouraged his work. Box 4 includes a miscellaneous folder regarding insane asylums and contains legal documents, postcard images, and receipts for services. Languages include English, German, French and Italian, and transcriptions or translations follow some of the documents.

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Medical history of the 19th Regiment, Kansas Cavalry Volunteers

Bailey, Mahlon

Mahlon Bailey, the regimental surgeon, recorded this medical history of the 19th Kansas Cavalry. This history includes information on the hasty physicals given to new recruits, wounds received in battle, and other medical problems encountered on the trail, as well as general information about the day-to-day activities of the soldiers. Located at the end of the report is a chart detailing the medical problems of the regiment, including the number of cases of dysentery, gonorrhea, pneumonia, ulcers, burns, and sprains (among many others). At the end of these charts, Bailey expresses his appreciation to the commanders of the regiment, thanking them for following his medical advice and showing concern for the health of their soldiers.

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William A. Hammond to Andrew H. Reeder

Hammond, William Alexander, 1828-1900

Dr. William A. Hammond, secretary of the Pawnee town company, was post surgeon at Fort Riley, Kansas Territory, in 1854-55. He writes from the "Catholic Mission" (probably the Potawatomi mission at St. Mary's) to inform Governor Andrew H. Reeder that he has "just purchased from Mr. Wilson one whole interest (10 shares), and from Lt. Hunter one half an interest (5 shares)" for Reeder for a total cost of $1,800.00.

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Several reasons why flies should be unwelcome guests. Swat the fly!

An illustration copied from the Kansas State Board of Health Bulletin demonstrating poor health habits and encouraging people to limit contact with flies.

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Samuel Jay Crumbine

Dr. Samuel Crumbine in the State Board of Health office with his assistants Warren Crumbine and Bernice Vreeland.

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Dr. John R. Brinkley at a political rally

This black and white photograph shows Dr. John R. Brinkley, a physician from Milford, Kansas, standing beside an airplane with two unidentified men. Brinkley became famous for his controversial goat gland transplants and unconventional medical practice. He ran as an independent write-in candidate for governor of Kansas in 1930, 1932 and 1934.

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