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Page 1 of 22, showing 10 records out of 218 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

John Alexander Martin, governor of Kansas

This black and white photograph shows the tenth Governor of Kansas John Alexander Martin on the steps of the capitol in Topeka, Kansas with state office employees.

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William Henry Avery

A portrait of Governor William Henry Avery seated at his desk in the Kansas Capitol. He was born August 11, 1911 near Wakefield, Kansas, and graduated from Wakefield High School and the University of Kansas. A Republican, Avery served in the Kansas House of Representatives from 1950 to 1955. In 1954, he was elected to the United States House of Representatives and served until 1964. During his 10 years in Congress, he served on numerous committees. In 1964, Avery was elected the 37th governor of Kansas. He served one term as governor, losing a re-election bid to Robert Docking in 1966. After an unsuccessful bid for the United States Senate, Avery returned to private life.

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Edwin F. Abels

This black and white photograph shows Edwin F. Abels, (1892-1985). Abels born in Eudora, Kansas and a graduate of the University of Kansas began his newspaper career by joining the staff of the Parsons Sun in Chanute, Kansas. In 1923, he moved back to Lawrence, Kansas to became the editor and publisher of the Douglas County Republican, renamed the Lawrence Outlook. Actively involved in his community, Abels made a political bid in 1936 for a seat in the Kansas House of Representatives. He successfully served six regular sessions and one special session as a Republican from the Twelve District. In 1948, Abels chose not to seek re-election, but continued to serve the Lawrence community through a number of social appointments. On April 22, 1985, Abels passed away at the age of ninety-three in Lawrence, Kansas.

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Kansas Legislature, 1879

This sepia colored legislative panel shows members of the Kansas House of Representatives and the Senate. In the center of the panel, portraits of state officials have been inserted.

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Frederick Lee Hall

Hetzel Photo Lab, Dodge City, Kansas

This black and white photograph shows Kansas Lieutenant Governor Fred Lee Hall (1916-1970), campaigning for governor in Dodge City, Kansas. Hall's platform was calling for reform to clean up Topeka, Kansas, similarly to President Eisenhower's efforts to clean up Washington, D. C. In the November general election he defeated his Democratic challenger George Docking to become the thirty-third governor of Kansas, serving from 1955 to 1957. Hall served one term as governor and was unsuccessful in his attempt for a second term. He resigned in the final days of his administration on January 11, 1957 accepting the appointment as justice of the Kansas Supreme Court from 1957 to 1958 before stepping down to run for the governor?s office again. After being unsuccessful, he retired from his political career.

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Solomon Miller

A photograph of Solomon Miller, who was born in Lafayette, Indiana, in 1831 and raised in Prable County, Ohio. Solomon Miller came to Kansas Territory and founded the Kansas Chief newspaper at White Cloud in 1857. In 1872 Miller moved the Chief to Troy, Kansas. Miller served in both the Kansas House and Senate. He lived and worked in Troy until his death in 1897.

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Alfred Gray

Leonard & Martin

A photograph of Alfred Gray, who was born in Evans, New York. In March 1857 Gray made the decision to immigrate to Kansas, where, at the age of 26, he settled in Quindaro, opening a law and real estate office. Soon, however, Gray chose to return to the occupation of his father, and he ultimately built one of the best farms in Wyandotte County. Gray was chief clerk of the territorial legislature and was elected to the first state legislature; in April 1862 he entered the army and served as a regimental quartermaster with the Fifth Kansas Cavalry and the 10th Kansas Infantry regiments. Gray is best known for his post-Civil War activities. He served as director of the State Agricultural Society from 1866 to 1870 and was elected secretary of the State Board of Agriculture in 1872, serving in this capacity until his death in 1880.

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Edward Ferdinand Arn

Kansas. Dept. of Economic Development

This black and white photograph shows Edward Ferdinand Arn (1906-1998). A lawyer and World War II veteran, Arn began his career in politics when he was elected as Attorney General of Kansas from 1947 to 1949. The following year, 1950, he was appointed justice of the Kansas State Supreme Court, (1949-1950). That same year in November, Arn was elected the thirty-second Governor of Kansas and served two terms from 1951 to 1955. During his administration several government agencies were established including the Kansas Turnpike Authority, the State Grain Commission, and the Kansas Veteran's Commission.

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Dan Lykins at the National Trial Lawyers Association meeting in Washington, D.C.

A photograph showing Dan Lykins (far right), a prominent Topeka attorney and member of the Kansas Board of Regents with (left to right) Governors Bill Richardson, New Mexico; Kathleen Sebelius, Kansas; Brian Schweitzer, Montana; and Christine Gregoire, Washington at the National Trail Lawyers Association in Washington, D.C.

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Williard Davis

Mullen

This cabinet card shows Willard Davis, who served as Kansas' 10th Attorney General from January 8, 1877 to January 10, 1881. He was born January 26, 1837 in Madison County, Kentucky. He attended Missouri University, then studied law at Lexington, Kentucky, and was admitted to practice there. When the war began, he was commissioned into the Union army as a Lieutenant in the Thirty-First Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, but his military career was brief due to failing health. On March 14, 1863, Davis was appointed by President Abraham Lincoln as the Internal Revenue Collector for Kentucky. He held the position until September 1, 1866 when he was dismissed for failure to accept President Andrew Johnson's policies. Davis resumed his law career and advocated for civil rights for freed slaves. In the fall of 1870, Davis moved to Neosho Falls, Kansas and became the attorney for the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway Company. The following year he settled in Parsons, Kansas and was elected the town's first mayor. To focus on his political career, he resigned from the railroad in 1873. In 1874, he was elected county attorney for Labette County, Kansas. He held this office until he was elected in 1876 to serve as Attorney General for the State of Kansas. After two terms he returned to his private law practice. On December 6, 1885 at the age of forty-eight, he passed away after a lengthy illness at his home at Eleventh and Van Buren Street in Topeka, Kansas.

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