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Page 1 of 5, showing 10 records out of 46 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Samuel J. Crawford

Portrait of Samuel Johnson Crawford, 1835-1913, who served in the Union army during the Civil War and was the third Governor of Kansas from 1865 to 1868.

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Circular of the State Impartial Suffrage Association

This circular describes the efforts to secure suffrage for blacks and women in the state of Kansas. The flyer indicates the Henry B. Blackwell of New York and Mrs. Lucy Stone were traveling in Kansas at that time. The Association was being organized in 1867. S. N. Wood was the corresponding secretary for the association. There is a hand written note on the back from H. C. Whitney, Lawrence, Kansas, indicating his willingness to speak for the group.

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The new chicken in the barnyard

Judge Magazine

This cartoon, from the cover of the satirical magazine Judge, illustrates the ?birth? of the Populist Party. Hovering over the chick (who has a banner on his straw hat labeled ?Farmer?s Alliance") is a rooster symbolizing the Republican Party, and a chicken, representing the Democratic Party. The subtitle reads, ?THE LITTLE CHICK (to old parties -- "You?re too big for me just now, 'tis true, but I?ll lick you both in ?92. Cock-a-doodle-doodle-doo!!?

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The Grangers' dream of cheap money

Puck

This political cartoon from the satirical Puck magazine illustrates the Republican perception of the People?s (Populist) Party belief in the coinage of silver and the redistribution of wealth to the masses. In the cartoon, Populist senator William Peffer uses a bellows to propel the windmill of the U.S. Treasury in order to pump out more ?greenbacks.? Outside the windmill, farmers are hungrily grabbing bags of money and carting them away in wagons. Billboards in the nearby town refer to the rapid inflation caused by the distribution of so much money.

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To the people of Kansas

Kansas. Legislature. House of Representatives

This brief statement by the Kansas Republican House of Representatives, led by George Douglass, was written during the Populist War of 1893 in order to affirm that the Republican Party stood for ?the supremacy of law and order against anarchy.? During this ?war,? the state had two houses -- the Populist (Dunsmore) House and the Republican (Douglass) House -- both of which claimed to have been the legally elected House of Representatives for the state. Initially the two houses had conducted their business side by side in Representative Hall, but on February 13, 1893, the Populist Dunsmore House barricaded the hall and prevented the Republican congressmen from entering the chambers. The Republican Douglass house responded by attacking the doors of the hall with sledgehammers. Both sides stood at a standstill until February 25, when a decision from the Kansas Supreme Court stated that the Republican House was the legally elected representative body.

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Puppetmaster political cartoon

Ottawa Journal and Triumph

This political cartoon from the Ottawa Journal and Triumph, published in Franklin County, presents the Populist perspective on big business and its ties to the government. In the cartoon, a puppet master (with a hat that reads "corporations") controls five marionettes, labeled with official positions such as "major," "judge," and "governor." The largest marionette, at the center, is President Grover Cleveland.

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Alfred Mossman Landon

This is an image of First Lieutenant Alfred Mossman Landon, 1887-1987, dressed in military uniform. He served in the United States Army Chemical Warfare Service.

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Populist members of the Dunsmore House at the Kansas Statehouse

Farrow, W. F.

This group picture, taken during or after the Legislative War of 1893, depicts the members of the Dunsmore House (Populist), and a few women and children, standing on the statehouse steps in Topeka, Kansas. The validity of the election of 1893 had been called in question, and thus two houses, the Douglass House (Republican) and Dunsmore House (Populist), both occupied Representative Hall and claimed to be the legally elected legislative body. On February 13, 1893, the Populist Dunsmore House barricaded the hall and prevented the Republican congressmen from entering the chambers. The Republican Douglass house responded by attacking the doors of the hall with sledgehammers. The Douglass House then recruited six hundred guards (called sergeants-at-arms) to guard the hall, refusing an order from Governor Lorenzo Lewelling to vacate the premises. Finally, on the night of February 16, the ousted Populists agreed to wait for the verdict from the Supreme Court while the Republicans maintained control of the House, and on February 25, the Supreme Court affirmed the validity of the Republican House. This event, although it lasted only twelve days, came to be known as the Legislative War or the Populist War.

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Samuel Clarke Pomeroy, United States Senator from Kansas

Merritt & Van Wagner

Samuel Clarke Pomeroy, United States Senator from Kansas, seated in a horse drawn carriage in front of a residence, Washington D.C.

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Abraham Lincoln

A portrait of Abraham Lincoln. In December 1859, Lincoln traveled to the Kansas Territory and spoke at Elwood, Troy, Doniphan, Atchison, and Leavenworth. His speeches covered several issues including preventing the expansion of slavery, the theory of popular sovereignty, and the evils of states seceding from the Union. In 1860, Lincoln received the Republican party's nomination for president. Although Kansans liked him the delegation from the territory did not support his nomination. He won the election, and on February 22, 1861, at Independence Hall, Philadelphia, PA, Lincoln raised the United States flag bearing a 34th star, honoring Kansas as the newest state.

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